PROCEEDINGS - Session Chair Reports

 

Submitted Session Chair Reports

Session Name: 

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Zishu Wang


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Complexities lead high uncertainties for IA processes. More efforts should be made to enhance effectiveness for making decisions

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

System thinking and digital approaches can be sufficient for IA processes. Health impact assessment, digital EIA, social impact assessment, and policy effectiveness evaluation should be conducted to support better policy-making.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Based on 9 presentations from 8 different countries, we agreed that more concerns about stakeholders, careful arguments for IA reports can enhance IA effectiveness for a just transformation.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

IA has been an sufficient tool for policy-making. The new trends of IA including HIA, digital EIA, SIA, institutional impact assessment, and policy effectiveness evaluation, and so on.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

More concerns about stakeholders, careful arguments for IA reports, and more adoptions of digital technologies (e.g., big data, AI, etc.).


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Policy makers must realize the necessity and complexity of IA processes. System thinking and process-based evaluation are strongly recommended.


Session Name:  Relevance of Indigenous knowledge and perspectives for just transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Johanne Hanko


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

• Holistic approaches that integrate community engagement, participatory decision-making, and respect for Indigenous rights, land, and knowledge systems promote balance between environmental protection and social justice. • Monitoring and assessment should include Indigenous communities allowing them to share their knowledge on resource management and climate change mitigation strategies. • Incorporating Indigenous perspectives into decision-making processes and impact assessment is fundamental for achieving sustainable development and a just transformation.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

• Indigenous communities have the right to decide what is important for them and their community and should be involved in the decision-making process. • Indigenous communities can prioritize requirement procedures based on their experience. • Indigenous communities generally wish to maintain their way of life which means that they need to address cumulative effects and safeguard remaining intact landscapes. • Recognizing Indigenous authorities can facilitate traditional governance structures within their communities and the incorporation of customary law into the decision-making process. • Meaningful consultation with Indigenous communities contributes to impact mitigation, conflict resolution, and sustainable development. • Synergizing traditional knowledge with modern and scientific development practices contributes to safeguarding environmental and local resources while promoting sustainable development. • Cumulative effects assessments empower the community to bring forward their own information to impact assessments and to influence decisions on regional issues, which are important steps for a just transformation.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

In Sweden, a community-led Climate Impact Assessment procedure was initiated aiming to provide guidelines to state agencies, regional governments and municipalities on how climate impact assessments could be integrated into decision-making. Indigenous Sámi reindeer herders collaborated as experts in identifying relevant climate indicators. Climate scientists then extracted the information from climate models and can downscale information to suit reindeer herding needs and identify possible impacts from future climate change. In Northern Alberta Canada, the Fort McKay Métis Nation developed a Community-Based Environmental Monitoring (CBEM) program to coordinate a diverse suite of baseline studies to monitor, assess, and reduce cumulative effects applying a braiding knowledge (or Two-Eyed Seeing) approach to bring together information from different sources of knowledge, including Indigenous knowledge, the scientific literature, and other sources. In Suriname, a Strategic Environmental and Social Assessment was conducted as a participatory tool that aims to integrate Environmental and Social considerations into policies, plans and programs in the mining sector’s decision-making process and reform. The study showed that meaningful and continuous Indigenous and tribal community participation allows the sharing of traditional knowledge, the promotion of sustainable development as to lead to a just transformation.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Participation of Indigenous communities at the initial stages of a project, helps avoid problems or conflicts during the implementation and operation of a project.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Ensure that local stakeholders, especially Indigenous communities, include their knowledge and perspective of a situation or location.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Policy makers and other stakeholders need to improve their climate knowledge and strengthen their capacity


Session Name:  185: Just transition and transformation of the coast and maritime

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Louise Davis


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1. It is very important at an early stage to communicate and bring traditional marine user stakeholders, such as fishers, alongside transition plans and projects within the marine and coastal space. 2. The pace of development in the race to net zero across many jurisdictions and permitting regimes makes it a complicated and cumulative picture for Impact Assessors to get to grips with in a short space of time 3. Traditional environmental mitigation measures need to be challenged in line with changing baselines and more suitable nature based methods, particularly in coastal environments subject to erosion.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Ensuring that social impact is included in EIA assessments; currently this is lacking in the EU and UK in particular. Ensuring that Strategic/Regional Marine Planning accounts for social and economic impact assessment and creates plans and mitigation to ensure that this is considered in any marine planning.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

There is an opportunity to share lessons learned between countries e.g. stakeholder engagement practices and economic impact assessments relating to the fishing community in relation to marine developments. Also, there is an opportunity to ensure strategic planning accounts for likely cumulative effects and mitigation that can be filtered down to ESIA / project level i.e. not trying to tackle these issues at a project level.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Early stakeholder engagement and tailoring messaging to stakeholder groups is important during Impact Assessments.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

In the marine space, look to other more established markets for how the technology has been assessed and deployed under SEA/ESIA and what the learnings are. For example, in Italy offshore wind is just starting out but it appears they have very similar issues to that encountered by established offshore wind markets like the UK and other countries that have had this technology for decades.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Marine spatial planning and SEA should be carried out at a strategic level to enable a just transition.


Session Name:  214 Effective Use of IA tools and partnerships to protect climate and biodiversity through just transition

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Susan Scott


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Through sharing practical experiences and tools from our own work we can leverage best practices to enhance the process. Three very practical case studies shared from 3 different parts of the world, 3 different focus areas but all delivered lessons and tools for practitioners.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

IA practitioners from all areas of the practice, regions, perspectives have expertise and experience to contribute and by continuing the dialogue and embracing new ideas, tools and partnerships we can contribute effectively to the just transformation from many directions.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

"Doing the work" through effective IAs and related activities can result in end products that gain buy-in from multiple stakeholders - affected communities, regulators, investors, business etc.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  265 Benefit-sharing for a fair and just transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Carlos Perez Brito


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

There is a large variation in benefit sharing agreements with multiple outcomes, positive and negative. Communities need support and proven models to improve benefit sharing negotiations and achieve better outcomes. Benefit sharing schemes will continue playing a significant role for the energy just transition.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Strong community engagement and leadership from indigenous communities. Indigenous communities are not stakeholders but right holders.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

There are multiple examples of renewable energy from Canada and Alaska that demonstrate positive outcome for first nations and local communities. Some of those cases have documented their methods and data analysis to demonstrate outcomes particularly cases of community-led energy generation.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

We need to collect and document more cases of successful benefit sharing agreements with communities and document better how those cases have positively impacted communities.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

More data is needed to document barriers to develop more benefit sharing agreements. The role and participation of local governments is fundamental.


Session Name:  A REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT APPROACH TO ASSIST DECARBONIZATION

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Becky Hitchin


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

- Regional assessment is hugely varied and important - Consultation needs to lead from a position to non-trust to trust to allow for effective and There was a 40 min meaningful discussion on just transformation - with a focus on regional considerations and community engagement. - Regulatory wording can contribute to both positive or negative consideration of just transformation - Context of regional aspects of IA are important, but the transposition of project-specific IA often confounds the 'larger-scale' assessment

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

- Ensuring that legislation is appropriate for all - for example, the requirements and outcomes of the BBNJ treaty needs to be applicable to all - Ensuring that expert modelling and monitoring evidence can be transposed across boundaries - Ensuring that transboundary impacts are considered fully in IA - Ensuring that communities should not be disadvantaged by consultation exhaustion - Ensuring that there is a positive feedback to communities to reassure them that engagement in IA is 'heard', not lost, and actually results in positive action to inform and resolve significant effects for communities - this is especially the case with either initial impacts on communities, or, through decommissioning and impacts on communities where they have been 'reliant' upon that project/sector, and feel that their concerns about community security and future prosperity are not assessed equitably/appropriately. This factor needs to be more 'upfront' and considered and actioned

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

- Consultation that allows communities to 'keep up' with developments and expectations of a just transition - The need for expert and meaningful SEA/REA roles within BBNJ and national jurisdiction - Consideration of regional-scale environmental impacts and the relation to systems/ecosystems, and how these are considered - The capturing of 'lessons learnt' and how 'all' involved can learn and build upon those - Archiving of data, both evidence base and also decision-making determinations, so that these can be accessible to inform future projects, all stakeholders, engagement, and enable consistent determinations/assessments


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

- The role of regional assessments and cumulative impact assessments needs to be recognized better - There is a definite need for consultation fatigue to be recognized, and thus, more effective engagement and use of community IA outcomes to better inform projects, and strategic consideration of IA


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

- Practitioners of EIA and SEA should become more connected with stakeholders given an ever-increasing need to understand both environmental and societal aspects of plans and projects - To be aware that rapidly evolving regulatory procedures in the marine environment still have to learn lessons connecting plan-level assessments (e.g. SEA and REA) with regulation/assessment of project-specific IA - If one has robust regional-scale data/assessment(s) then strive to facilitate the connection of those to project-specific IA - Being cognizant of, and accessing, community IA consultation determinations/inputs and ensuring that those are used effectively to inform project-specific IA - for certain sectors/projects this will likely be most critical for construction and decommissioning phases concerning community engagement - Where data repositories are available, then IA practitioners should encourage clients to deposit their data to better inform future plans and projects - Where data repositories do not exist, then IA practitioners should attempt, where possible, to encourage the development of such facilitation


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

- Learn lessons from community engagement - Look strategically to alleviate consultation fatigue - Facilitate the implementation of SEA/REA and ensure that mechanisms are effective in 'drawing down' those assessments to better inform project-specific IA - Establish/fund/manage/maintain accessible data repositories for SEA/REA data - Establish/fund/manage/maintain accessible data repositories for project-specific IA baseline and assessment data and documents (ES, EIARs etc.) and examination/regulatory determinations


Session Name:  Addressing mining impacts driven by an energy transition

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Laura Sonter, Luis Sanchez


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Minerals are a key component for an energy transition but addressing environmental risks is essential for transformation.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

1. New, improved and more comprehensive datasets are needed to quantify risks and impacts of mining, and 2. energy transformation decisions must be guided by the science underpinned by these new datasets and analyses.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

New methods in impact assessments are needed to address the unknown species, ecosystems and functions threatened by mining and energy projects.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Assessments needed across multiple spatial scales - from project level EIAs to global scale assessments.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

More in-depth considerations of biodiversity threats from mining are needed for energy transformation.


Session Name:  AI supported transformation of collection and assessing biodiversity data

Name(s) of session chair(s):

2


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Consider complex interrelationships and multiple crises such as loss of biodiversity and cc benegiting from AI

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

AI can support transparent decision making and just transformation also by longer term monitoring of complex interrelationships

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Integration of other disciplines especially for next years conference tackling AI topics


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Engage with colleagues from outside IA community to consider their experience on novel opportunities and risks rekated to novel technological advances


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Pro-actively discussing on quality control, responsibilities, novel standards on the Integration of AI and complex models


Session Name:  Asian S3EA: Strategic, spatial and sustainable EA (I)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Myungjin Kim


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

IA method and system should suppprt the strategic decision for just transformation. For persuasion reliable data is so impprtant.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

IA method and system should apply with reliable and easy to publuc access.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The future of IA is the future of IAIA. IA method and system should develop for just transformation society with wisdom.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

IA idea and wisdom can be inferred from old sayings and saint particularly in Asia .


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Practitioners would develop themselves with sound thought, research and practice. With wise pride they should develop society for just transformation based on science and experiences.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

In policy level IA is so important and communication between policy makers and stakeholders shouls focus for well-being and just transformation


Session Name:  Asian S3EA: Strategic, spatial, sustainable EA (II)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Takehiko Murayama


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Sharing formal and informal systems, experiences and challenges among various countries

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Consideration of priorities in view of importance, effectiveness and feasibility.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

- Implementation case of SEA in coastal area in Saudi Arabia - Comparative study of the relation between SEA and land use planning - Case study for tourism impact in view of blue economy


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  BLUE ECONOMY, SEA AND MARINE SPATIAL PLANNING

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Arthur Neher; Arend Kolhoff


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

SEA tied early into the planning and decision-making process shows to be not only cost-effective and avoids adverse impacts in the marine environment, but also incorporates all relevant stakeholders in a timely manner at all stages, and promotes a balanced approach considering the best alternative in a transparent manner.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

SEA needs to be an integral part of the decision-making process from the start. In the presentations in our session such early integrated approach resulted in good and transparent marine plans and presented the follow-up actions to mitigate issues in situations of conflicting interest.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

To effectively support (marine) spatial planning, prior to embark on the required SEA process and serving as input to the scoping and monitoring phase, much data and information needs to be collected. This may be a barrier to many low- and middle income countries due to capacity and finance involved. Integarting SEA in decision-making requires collaboration of all (setoral) parties involved and adequate funds to complete the process. A roadmap developing a framework prior to starting the SEA is required for consensus on roles and responsibilities.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

SEA is much related to the context it applies to. Most low- to middle income countries do not avail over the required capacity and financial means, even if understanding of SEA is present. Practical examples facilitate understanding and acceptance, and incorporation in legislation in less-advanced countries. Adequate financial support within the national budget should be made available to implement SEA, avoiding unwanted cost of wrong decions and encourage ownership. If not (adequately) available, the international donor community should step-up in support.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

An SEA ideally should be connected to a regional, national, or sub-national single- or multi-sectoral plan, in wich sustainability objectives are connected to a vision for a pre-set period. Assessment of impacts can be better performed if such framework is available, and proponents of SEA (often the national government) should be encouraged to incorporate SEA in the appropriate (level of) plans.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Policy-makers: integrate SEA as early as possible in the planning process, have adequate budget and capacity (including required scientific data) available, and budget for monitoring and compliance. Additionally, ensure public participation and awareness during the entire process and after implementing the SEA. This can be achieved through having sufficient budget available for communication tools.


Session Name:  BLUE ECONOMY, SEA AND MARINE SPATIAL PLANNING

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Arthur Neher; Arend Kolhoff


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

SEA tied early into the planning and decision-making process shows to be not only cost-effective and avoids adverse impacts in the marine environment, but also incorporates all relevant stakeholders in a timely manner at all stages, and promotes a balanced approach considering the best alternative in a transparent manner.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

SEA needs to be an integral part of the decision-making process from the start. In the presentations in our session such early integrated approach resulted in good and transparent marine plans and presented the follow-up actions to mitigate issues in situations of conflicting interest.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

To effectively support (marine) spatial planning, prior to embark on the required SEA process and serving as input to the scoping and monitoring phase, much data and information needs to be collected. This may be a barrier to many low- and middle income countries due to capacity and finance involved. Integarting SEA in decision-making requires collaboration of all (setoral) parties involved and adequate funds to complete the process. A roadmap developing a framework prior to starting the SEA is required for consensus on roles and responsibilities.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

SEA is much related to the context it applies to. Most low- to middle income countries do not avail over the required capacity and financial means, even if understanding of SEA is present. Practical examples facilitate understanding and acceptance, and incorporation in legislation in less-advanced countries. Adequate financial support within the national budget should be made available to implement SEA, avoiding unwanted cost of wrong decions and encourage ownership. If not (adequately) available, the international donor community should step-up in support.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

An SEA ideally should be connected to a regional, national, or sub-national single- or multi-sectoral plan, in wich sustainability objectives are connected to a vision for a pre-set period. Assessment of impacts can be better performed if such framework is available, and proponents of SEA (often the national government) should be encouraged to incorporate SEA in the appropriate (level of) plans.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Policy-makers: integrate SEA as early as possible in the planning process, have adequate budget and capacity (including required scientific data) available, and budget for monitoring and compliance. Additionally, ensure public participation and awareness during the entire process and after implementing the SEA. This can be achieved through having sufficient budget available for communication tools.


Session Name:  Brainstorming best practice IA principles for extraterrestrial developments

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Steve Mustow


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1) The extraterrestrial environment has significant value and should be protected. 2) Impact assessment has an important part to play. 3) Mistakes made on earth regarding environmental protection should not be repeated in space.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

The publication and adoption of the draft IAIA international best practice principles discussed in the session will support this.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Numerous helpful insights and comments were provided by the workshop participants which will be taken into account when finalising the international best practice principles.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Practitioners undertaking impact assessment of space sector activities need to consider impacts to the extraterrestrial environment as well as to environments on Earth.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Recommended to follow the new extraterrestrial IA international best practice principles when accepted and published.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

It is recommended that policy makers and other stakeholders take appropriate account of the international best practice procedures once accepted and published by IAIA.


Session Name:  Brainstorming best practice IA principles for extraterrestrial developments

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Steve Mustow


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1) The extraterrestrial environment has significant value and should be protected. 2) Impact assessment has an important part to play. 3) Mistakes made on earth regarding environmental protection should not be repeated in space.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

The publication and adoption of the draft IAIA international best practice principles discussed in the session will support this.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Numerous helpful insights and comments were provided by the workshop participants which will be taken into account when finalising the international best practice principles.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Practitioners undertaking impact assessment of space sector activities need to consider impacts to the extraterrestrial environment as well as to environments on Earth.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Recommended to follow the new extraterrestrial IA international best practice principles when accepted and published.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

It is recommended that policy makers and other stakeholders take appropriate account of the international best practice procedures once accepted and published by IAIA.


Session Name:  Climate, Energy and Agriculture / Forestry Linkages

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Ijeoma Vincent-Akpu


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

How impact assessment has been used in fisheries production and working with the community to protect their Rivers

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Habitat protection and good Aquaculture practice should be considered before any approval should be given.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

For a just transformation, there is need for social inclusion and benefits for the people to lead to their acceptance of the transformation


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

There's need to have a global network for people with similar problems or solutions on impact assessment so as to avoid reinventing the wheel


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Making greater use of networking and connection to speed up impact assessment conversation. Connection within and outside IAIA.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Impact Assessment of individual project is not enough but should regard more on Strategic thinking or Strategy Environmental Assessment.


Session Name:  Community Benefit Funds - Changemakers or appeasement

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Rebecca Roebuck


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Community benefits funds can potentially be both changemakers and appeasement. There is mixed evidence about their demonstrable long term positive social impacts. Social impact assessment could link more to community benefit funds.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Collecting impact data after & monitoring effectiveness is a key factor that could support the contribution of community benefit funds to just transformation. Decision making could be assisted by more global evidence about the effectiveness of community benefit funds and when and in what circumstances they should be used as changemakers rather than primarily for corporate social responsibility or community social licence building.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Examples in this session was the key question about who benefits from community benefit funds and equity considerations.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Impact assessment needs to muscle into community benefit funds


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Encourage evaluation and impact measurement of the social change generated through community benefit funds.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Don’t assume community benefit funds will have a positive social impact or generate meaningful social change.


Session Name:  Community engagement and benefit-sharing contributions to a just transition

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Orlando San Martin


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Supporting a just transition and community acceptance of renewable projects, regulatory landscapes need to be understood and community benefit sharing mechanisms strengthened, ensuring renewable projects operate in a way that adds value to shareholders, countries, and local communities. Evaluating people-positivity of renewable energy projects can help propell progress towards a more just transformation, similarly to carbon and biodiversity net-impact measurement frameworks. The approach taken by a successful project included early engagement allowing the opportunity for local people to input on the project development path. Importantly, feedback from the community on both the project design, and the local benefit was incorporated into the project proposal.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

We propose that there is a need for a people-positive evaluation framework in order to deliver a just transformation. The shared value approach is crucial to avoid business’ obstacles. An entrepreneurship progr at the local tech school empowered local businesses, and a Social Fund gave back to the community through NGO.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Actively demonstrating an understanding of local communities - and a willingness to accommodate and adapt to their needs is vital in developing renewable projects. Two examples in Scotland demonstrate this in practice. With a wind farm in proximity to the world- famous Loch Ness, pro-active engagement with tourism stakeholders was seen as essential by the engagement team. The social acceptance gained from the open, transparent and inclusive public engagement approach is delivering for both the project and the local community. No legal challenge was taken on the planning permit secured and the project is being constructed and moving towards the operational phase. The local community benefits being delivered as part of this project have been guided by early-stage involvement and feedback from the local community. Leaving coal behind, Spain created ENTAMA to foster business entrepreneurship and reskill. The Sines Coal Power Plant shut down was known 6 months before its closing. An action plan was set: A consortium of 2 Univ. studied the Local Economy: future jobs, cultural outlines, reskill. With the City Hall and the Nat. Employm’t Instt., we created a local cabinet, with job training, psychological support and social rescue for the population. An entrepreneurship progr at the local tech school empowered local businesses, and a Social Fund gave back to the community through ONG.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Sharing benefits from the projects in order to promote a just transition should be discussed and understood better among multiple stakeholders


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Impact assessment practitioners and community engagement and liaison staff will benefit to clarify scope of impact mitigations - which are usually mandatory - and demand more rigorous SIA - from community benefit sharing that not necessarily are proportional or related to the impacts but search to promote a just transition.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Policy makers ... contribute to multistakeholder dialogue regarding best practices for benefit sharing .. there are so many opinions about the matter that projects and companies even with the best intention might end up doing wrong due to confusions and misunderstandings.


Session Name:  Compliance/Enforcement for transformative ESIA project impact management

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Bryony Walmsley


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

a. Good implementation is essential b. Environmental auditing should be embedded in legislation c. Transparency in decision-making and compliance auditing

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

a. Clear roles and responsibilities relating to enforcement b. Capacity building of enforcement agencies is needed c. Consistency of decision-making

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

a. Lack of capacity within regulatory authorities is a major challenge b. AI presents an opportunity with regards to supporting decisions c. Improved levels of inter-ministerial collaboration/coordination


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

How to deal with the issue of scope creep or the incrementation development of projects.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

How to deal with the issue of scope creep or the incrementation development of projects.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

N/A


Session Name:  Connecting people and planet

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Caroline Brodeur


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

- We are still in the early stage of bringing environment and human rights together. Importance to learn from both discipline. - Complexity of the 2 disciplines which require different skill sets. - Importance to keep people at the center and ensure meaningful participation of rights holders in complex processes.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

- Bringing different expertise together. - Need to break the sillos and understand the interconnection between human rights and environment. - A healthy environment is needed to ensure respect of human rights.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Major human rights abuses in the seafood industry, the repercussion of decrease in marine population + pollution of sea on human rights of local communities + small scale fishers. Importance to consider how the environment is affecting their rights. Importance to bring together environmental and more quantitative approaches to support the more qualitative data from human rights impact assessment.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Take the time to learn from local communities and indigenous processes, important learning to be made from those participatory processes.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Need to make human rights due diligence mandatory. This will level the playing field and ensure greater quality of impact assessment + greater respect of human rights.


Session Name:  Consideration of climate change in IA of different countries

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Bobbi Schijf & Ishara Autar


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

different approaches to assess GHG emmissions

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

more abstract plan vs more detailed project

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

we have many methological options to calculate GHG emissions/determine significance, but aside from the how, lets also remember the why


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  Consideration of climate change in IA of different countries

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Bobbi Schijf & Ishara Autar


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

collaborate with indigenous people from the start of the assessment/project

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

we have a lot of knowledge about the impacts of CC, but we need to translate it to a specific context

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

HIA of Wales (uk), we know climate factors for health


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

green transition is not just , because we do not assess climate impact


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

dont call indegenous people stakeholders, but rightholders


Session Name:  Consideration of wider health determinants in impact assessments

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Hung Shiu Fung


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Impact Assessments in different disciplines can look at things differently, using different approaches to assess impacts. A just transformation requires impact assessments to cover new subjects and explore new approaches and adjusting the terminologies.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Identifying determinants, engaging stakeholders, training, and providing guidance are the key factors to ensuring that impact assessment focuses on the cause of the problems and develops solutions.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Impact assessment provides the tools to understand the issues in a just transformation and the platform to engage with stakeholders. For example, it can help understand the vulnerability of the local community and formulate actions to address the risks. However, there are still challenges in turning information into action and getting commitments in higher-level decision-making.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

As environmental assessment extends the environmental impact to wider health determinants and health assessment incorporates the implications of environmental change, we need the expertise and experience in both the environmental and health impact assessment practices.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Practitioners in different impact assessment types (Environmental, health, social, etc) could learn from each other, especially in the framing of problems and the approaches used in the assessment.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

For policymakers, the international experience could be a good reference, but understanding the local context is crucial in making the policies.


Session Name:  Declaration on the Rights of People Affected by Development-Forced Displacement and Resettlement (DFDR)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Eddie Smyth and Susanna Price


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

The top lesson was that we must implement a fair and equitable appraoch to projects in order to achieve a just transformation.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Current approaches to securing project land access are disempowering, and they marginalise and impoverish affected people. We presented six principles and 26 recommendations on how impact assessment can contribute to a just transformation.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

We had an Indigenous leader present his experiences from impact assessment in Canada where communities are giving almost no support but expected to play a role in responding to thousands of projects EIAs on their territories. He made the case for significant resources to be provided to Indigenous Peoples to enable co-design and co-decision-making around projects.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

The Declaration was very well received and the attendees agreed to endorse the Declaration through an applause at the end of the session.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Read the Dublin Declaration on FELA and provide feedback to the Working Group Co-Chairs: eddiesmyth@intersocialconsulting.com and susanna.price@gmail.com


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Read the Dublin Declaration on FELA and provide feedback to the Working Group Co-Chairs: eddiesmyth@intersocialconsulting.com and susanna.price@gmail.com


Session Name:  Decolonizing SIA through the attitudes and beliefs of practitioners

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Alex Cisneros Menchaca


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Despite good efforts by individuals, groups, developers, and regulators to uphold a just transformation, there are wide systemic and cultural challenges to achieve it, starting with our understanding of justness and equity. A just transformation will require a deep look in the way we conduct Social Impact Assessments (SIA), and a deeper look at the attitudes and beliefs of SIA practitioners and regulators and the way we relate to each other as people. Without a self-reflexive, intentional attempt to decolonise SIA, we run the risk of perpetuating coloniality in relations between project developers and communities.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

With a growing discourse on the need to go faster and farther in the transformation, the discussion on whether we are even going in a just direction is often eclipsed. One of the key factors that can help make sure that IA contributes to a just transformation is by countering the growing sense of urgency that corners any discussion into a single response. A more equitable transformation will require varying rhythms and contrasting meanings of development. It will require placing policy makers, developers and communities as peers in joint decision-making for any justness to get started, and most importantly, it will take conscious effort to be comfortable with uncomfortable timings that will often be at odds with wider industry, policy priorities, and global economy speeds.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The session illustrated the challenges of SIA with great examples, from analysing culturally unprepared systems (mis)regulating SIA, to regional policies that dilute the participation of indigenous peoples to imperceptible extents in final decision-making, to the way practitioners' beliefs shape the design and implementation of SIAs and ultimately the way developers and communities relate to each other. The opportunities to reverse these trends lie on practitioners and regulators unlearning what we have come to accept as traditional SIA practice, and reconsider our approaches to see SIA as a relational practice with which we can shape more equitable relations.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Taking one of the key messages from IAIA23, a 'green' project (e.g., renewable energy) does not automatically make it a just project. The way projects are planned, constructed, operated and closed matter much more than imagined. The attitudes and beliefs with which projects are developed frame the type of relations it will build with local communities. Respectful, recognitive, and decolonial attitudes will form more equitable relations and foster relational justness, which is more relevant to sustainability than irreflective technological transitions.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  Developing an IAIA agenda for SEA action towards a just transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Rob Verheem


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Looking at 25 years of SEA we see many improvements, including worldwide application, recognition as an important tool, good practice well understood, guidance and capacity development available and quality and effectiveness improving. However, we also see a number of elements where SEA still falls short, including insufficient influence on strategic planning and decision making, uneven quality, limited understanding within many governments, too legalistic application and insufficient stakeholder participation.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

An IAIA action agenda to deal with current shortcomings in SEA transformation should evolve around 4 priorities: intensified advocacy and awareness raising, innovation, research and strengthened legal and institutional arrangements.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The session discussed a draft proposal for an IAIA agenda for SEA action and research. Under each of the 4 priorities actions were discussed and prioritized. Also, several actions were discussed needed to start implementation of the agenda. Amongst these is the possible revitalisation of the SEA section.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

See previous boxes


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

See previous boxes


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

See previous boxes


Session Name:  Disasters and Conflicts

Name(s) of session chair(s):

C. Kelly


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Disasters and crisis need to be considered in impact assessment.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Participation; social vulnerability, adjusting how impact assessment is done to match the real situation.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

New World Bank framework for impact assessment in fragile or conflict-affected countries. Social vulnerability analysis of the impact of hazards as part disaster risk reduction.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Disasters present diverse opportunities using impact assessment.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Consider the possibility of disasters or other crises in the assessment process.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Expect disasters or other crises to be mentioned in impact assessments.


Session Name:  Effectively achieving and measuring biodiversity (II)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Nicola Faulks


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

The process of biodiversity enhancement needs to be measurable, at the current time this is a developing practice. There are many developing systems and methodologies to do this, but each needs to be evaluated for effectiveness on a project by project basis.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Look at what is being done, and has been done. Look at emerging technologies. Apply lessons learned and future new technologies to continue to develop the use of net gain in decision making.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Nature and ecosystems are so diverse, there will be no one system fits all.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Net gain is required, and the path towards net gain needs to be measurable. The ability to measure loss, and net gain is still very much in development. So a lessons learned, eyes open approach to IA is required.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Don't work in isolation, look at emerging technologies, and read up on the many examples out there where loss has been evaluated and net gain achieved, or being aimed for. Use and adapt examples.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Creating an accessible data base of project where offsetting has been used or on site compensation to achieve, or fail to achieve, net gain. This can be used as a reference database, and with time, lessons learned can be drawn from this, as well as proven technologies.


Session Name:  Emerging Practices in Indigenous Led Assessments

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Rosanne Van Schie and Sara Mainville


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1. Indigenous led assessments bring in values and participation beyond mainstream EA processes 2. Relationships with Decision-makers to coordinate and cooperate is incredibly important 3. Good examples of where lack of relationship led to good intentions bearing no benefit for the Indigenous peoples, Indigenous peoples need to be co-decision-makers in what accommodations/capacity will truly be helpful/have utility

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Cumulative Effects approaches need to include Indigenous values and perspectives of what is important and if the approach taken to the study is sound Proponent Led Studies are exclusionary rather than inclusive (Indigenous Led Studies aim to be relational and inclusionsary) Indigenous Knowledge is best approaches through Indigenous led assessments Proponent/Government/Indigenous Led collaboration is very important

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The challenge is to find a new process that approaches collaboration at the decision-making level. Less opaque government processes in how they consider Indigenous knowledge and Indigenous decision-making within their own considerations and assessment (holistic, transparent, measurable) Government to Government approach in Impact Assessment – a way to align processes and information gathering from stakeholders and proponents seems to be a path forward.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Net positive should be the goal of Impact Assessments and early collaboration on processes to collaborate and cooperate.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Engage Indigenous peoples inclusively – technicians, government, youth, and Indigenous knowledge keepers Water protection and sacred site protection are incredibly important values that must be managed appropriately seeking out Indigenous led perspectives on best approaches. UNDRIP conformity is a measure for all Governments in regarding to Indigenous territories. Very complex in regions such as Nigeria, a very ethnically diverse population with their own languages and cultural traditions across the country.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Review below report and particular passage: "Land is the foundation of the lives and cultures of indigenous peoples all over the world. Land rights, access to land and control over it and its resources are central for indigenous peoples’ wellbeing throughout the world. To survive as distinct peoples, indigenous peoples and their communities need to be able to own, preserve and manage their lands, territories and resources but the intensification of natural resource exploitation continues to adversely affect their lands and territories." State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, Rights to Lands, territories and resources, 5th Volume, available at https://www.un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/wpcontent/uploa ds/sites/19/2021/03/State-of-Worlds-Indigenous-Peoples-Vol-V-Final.pdf


Session Name:  Ensuring Just Transformation of Infrastructure Projects (I)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Camille Heaton


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Scorecards are a useful tool to assess sustainability. Borrowers are working with country legislation to align standards. Environmental data can enhance sustainability and offset goals. Private companies can learn from international standards of MDBs.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  Ensuring Just Transformation of Infrastructure Projects (II)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Camille Heaton


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Practitioners can promote the SDGs as essential parts of EIAs; as was done for the Copenhagen metro; it will take time for contractors and regulators to accept. Balancing all environmental and social aspects in routing of a road (Hong Kong) can be supported by in-depth social assessments.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Continue to look at alternatives--a Hydropower dam in Cameroon reduced the walls by 15 meters and saved many areas from being flooded. Have a vision and environmental and social principles up front when developing master plans (case from Saudi Arabia county).

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  Ensuring Just Transformation of Infrastructure Projects (IV)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Camille Heaton


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Private companies can use international environmental and social standards from lenders to improve their business practices. Analysis of environmental incidents can lead to prevention and quick response.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Involve the long term owners of the management plans and ensure they are involved.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Get the private companies and/or utilities that are sponsoring programs to have environmental social management systems that utilize best practices.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Use analysis and international standards to improve environmental assessments as well as outcomes.


Session Name:  Environmental management strategies and ethical professional practice for a Just Transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Alan Chenoweth


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Two lessons: A. Environmentally-responsible and socially sustainable resource management of marginal grazing land in sub-Saharan Africa requires balancing land restoration / soil protection measures (for Net Zero targets) with the needs of local communities & indigenous peoples engaged in subsistence farming/grazing, in the face of a variable and changing climate; and B. An important element in any environmental Just Transformation is TRUST (affected communities/stakeholders need to trust the competent assessment and honest advice of professional IA practitioners). This requires our work to be based on a sound foundation of ethics, both theory and practice.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

A. Consider the social, economic and cultural implications of recommendations regarding land use in marginal lands, where the livelihoods of disadvantaged groups has depended on certain land use practices for many generations, but sustainable land management and re-forestation may require changes to grazing/farming intensity; and B. In order to be trusted as impartial and accurate assessors & advisors, IA practitioners need to consider and regularly discuss the ethical basis of their overall approach and specific recommendations, with respect to both theory and practice, and both professional ethics and environmental ethics.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

A. Some environmentally-sustainable 'solutions' to land degradation (for example reducing deforestation of degraded marginal land in sub-Saharan Africa) may cause social, economic and cultural disruption for vulnerable local communities & indigenous peoples, which require a long term multi-disciplinary approach to minimize disruptive impacts B. Some expert assessments of likely environmental impacts and their significance may be technically objective but appear unethical or biased when perceived by affected communities or NGOs/conservation groups. A key question for practitioners is whether or not they would provide the same assessments/advice if engaged by or for project opponents as they would for project proponents.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

B. Impact assessment to date has not developed an adequate philosophical or ethical basis for addressing a just transformation. A new approach to ethically-based assessment is needed to achieve societal transformation to sustainability, 'Ecological humanism' and 'the categorical sustainability imperative' are two such approaches.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

A. Effective land resource management strategies for mitigations greenhouse gas emissions and preserving biodiversity must be inclusive, and consider social and cultural dimensions, it the changes are to address socio-economic disparities and avoid disproportionate burdens on disadvantaged/marginalized groups B. Develop, consider and regularly discuss the ethical basis for impact assessments, ensuring that our perspectives, advice and recommendations would be consistent irrespective of who is our client


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

A. Give equal weight to social equity considerations as to technical assessments and environmental sustainability, to ensure the burden of change does not fall disproportionally on local communities, disadvantaged communities and indigenous peoples B. Require IA practitioners to adhere to code(s) of professional ethics


Session Name:  Environmentally, Socially and Economically Just Carbon Neutrality

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Yuan Xu, Shigeo Nishikizawa


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Carbon neutrality is mainly an opportunity for a just transformation. Impact assessment can help identify and realize such opportunities.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Impact assessment can facilitate decision making by scoping, screening, comparing and identifying environmentally, socially and economically sustainable pathways toward just transformation.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Our discussion spans across countries. A key insight is that alternatives are available, but it is not a guarantee that a sustainable and just pathway will be taken. Countries face very different shaping factors in their assessment and realization of such pathways.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Impact assessment can be a useful decision-making tool for climate mitigation and adaptation to create opportunities and minimize challenges.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Climate mitigation and adaptation are an expanding and crucial field for impact assessment practitioners.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Policy makers can use impact assessment as a key tool for achieving climate mitigation and adaptation goals in sustainable and just manners.


Session Name:  Equity, Justice, and the Energy Transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Dr Richard Parsons and Dr Madeline Taylor


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Our session highlighted the importance of three key principles in energy development: Justice, Equity, and Fairness (JEF), and how IA can support these principles. The lessons learned stemmed from a variety of case studies across the world, including Australia, Japan, Africa, and India, on the importance of community-led decision making. Each of these case studies emphasised the critical need for communities to ensure that integration into development decisions aligns subjectively with their specific purposes. Throughout all presentations, participatory justice emerged as crucial for embedding fairness and equity into the IA process.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Key factors discussed included integrating energy justice in impact assessments for large-scale solar energy on sensitive land uses, such as agriculture, the importance of sustainable community opportunities in subsistence agriculture, different interpretations of the Social Licence to Operate, and the need to shift from DAD (Decide, Announce, Defend) perspectives on social risk to DAVE (declare dilemmas and issues, acknowledge, vision, and evaluate). The common factor underpinning these ideas is to fundamentally embed fairness by asking questions about what fair looks like in each project and who defines what is fair?

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Several key insights emerged from our divers session including: the importance of early engagement and risk-based regulation was highlighted in several presentations to avoid community ‘outrage’ by addressing ‘hazards’ at the outset; the need to shift from authorisation regulation to risk-based regulation to assess all risks in energy development and ensure they are As Low as Reasonably Practicable and prescribing rights and duties between states, proponents, and communities; and in the energy transformation, regulation and policy should be linked to a duty to transform communities for sustained wellbeing beyond impact mitigation.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Is it possible for (S)IA to truly deliver just, equitable and fair project outcomes, or is it a blunt tool in the face of structural power relations and corporate-capitalist agendas?


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Continually reflect on our practice and our role in either perpetuating or challenging processes that deliver unfair, inequitable, and unjust outcomes.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Develop legislation and regulations that supports the urgent need for a transformation that is just, fair and equitable. Without this institutional support, development outcomes will continue to reflect and reinforce the dominant unsustainable paradigm.


Session Name:  Exploring the Limitations of SIA in Achieving Sustainable Development

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Yaakob Hassan, Herlina Ab Aziz


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1. Collaborative Approach : The cornerstone of success in SIA when diverse stakeholders, from government agencies to industry players and SIA practitioners, come together to foster innovation, facilitates knowledge sharing, and drives the development of effective solutions to complex social challenges. 2. Transformative power of innovation and technology integration, leveraging tools like GIS and decision support systems has revolutionized our approach to SIA, to streamlines processes and enhances data accuracy and decision-making. 3. Just transformation requires holistic approaches to balance the need of business sectors, accountability of decision makings and understanding of challenges at communities and household level.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Collaborative approaches and technology integration to streamline processes and strategies in engagement and decision making.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

1. The commitment of PLANMalaysia, the caretaker department of SIA in Malaysia to prepare an SIA guidelines that provides clear step by step reference guidance in project preparation, evaluation and approval of SIA . 2. The Darul Hana Renewal Development example, that shows strong commitment by the state government in managing public engagement and social impacts of their government-led project to impacted communities.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

The importance of a dedicated impact association to represents impact assessors to support government initiatives and to be the mediator between them and the construction industry.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Continuous enhancement of skills and capacity in handling and balancing the stakeholders, project proponents and approving authorities expectations, including quality assessment, timely approval and minimum business risks.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Government full support to impact assessment as a tool to achieve SDGs goal.


Session Name:  Fair Compensation for Just Transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Satoshi Ishihara and Ben Elder


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

"Value" should be differently captured than "prices" which do not necessarily reflect the values that affected people lose from projects. in particular intangible values that are important to the welfare and wellbeing of affected people.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Good and meaningful stakeholder engagement is key to ensuring that all "values" important to affected people are captured and adequately compensated.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

A good and participatory social assessment is critical to identify all values important to the welfare and wellbeing of the affected people that are affected by the project.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Compensation and benefit sharing should be clearly and differently approached.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

A social impact assessment and valuation complement each other as good SIA allows identifying all losses of which the "value" can be estimated through proper valuation, including intangible losses.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

A compressive and thorough SIA is critical and provide a basis so all losses are adequately valuated and fairly compensated or otherwise mitigated.


Session Name:  Financing a just transition

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Joana Pedro


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

- Impact Assessment can be a powerful tool, but needs to put people at the center, have enough resources.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

- Impact assessment and decision-making time need also to respect affected community time - economic analyses on top of the analyses that are already done in the ESIAs could help discussion with other decison making

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  From the Top Down: Are Regional Assessments the key to long-term sustainability?

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Cindy Parker


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Due to the competing interests in land use there is an obvious need for regional planning, but it potential is often under realized or it is too late. The main barriers to regional assessment and planning is lack of political will and the discretionary nature of regional assessments.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Assessments at the project level are not working - if we want a just transformation we need to think strategically, long-term and at a regional level.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  Gender in Impact Assessment

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Dawn Hoogeveen


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1. There will be surprises in terms of gender in IAIA data collection and implementation in the future; 2. Integrating gender into IA needs to be done both inside and outside regulatory regimes to facilitate a just transformation; 3. Queer and LGBT2S+ futures need to be taken into account for a just transformation in IA.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Gender is not something to be considered through a check-box approach. Meaningful gender analysis needs to use good qualitative data collection methods that are community based.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Examples of robust qualitative data collection illustrated how the integration of gendered analyses in IA can lead to positive outcomes for communities. This included examples like performing extensive qualitative surveys with open ended questions in Uganda on artisinal mining practices and implementing community based health and safety mobile monitoring services in Lake Babine First Nation, in northwest Canada. Engaged gendered analysis in IA can lead to positive outcomes and facilitate a just transformation in IA. Challenges include closing the gap between robust research services and regulatory environments that are not fully aligned with best practices in gender in IA.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Gender in IA has come a long way in the last ten years.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Engage with interdisciplinary discussions and methods to implement practices in IA that account for health equity concerns, including gendered analysis and the integration of the voices of those who are difficult to reach due to systemic barriers.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Public participation and engagement in IA that integrates gendered analyses and data collection that can facilitate sound decision making and mitigation planning can be done at a regional and cumulative effects level. Collecting good data on gender to implement safeguards requires being sensitive and mindful of confidential. and challenging information, but remains an underutilized lens for analyzing project impacts and is significant for the future of IA.


Session Name:  How can nature-based approaches be promoted before impact assessment?

Name(s) of session chair(s):

2


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Some developers have started to work closely with the impact assessment (IA) team and are developing their projects in dialogue with the IA team Community ownership and decision power is important for follow up The multifunctionality of nature-based solutions is not always apparent to communities.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Community engagement, empowerment to allow communities to participate in decision making,

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

There maybe some examples, but we have not finished evaluating the session outcomes. Mostly examples mentioned illustrated what is not working at the moment.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Good process, but not used to its fullest, as restricted too narrowly within a few parameters.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Don’t be fearful and shy about community engagement.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

If projects can show that they have co-developed the project with communities a flexible approach for desired outcomes should be taken.


Session Name:  How to Conserve Biodiversity in Climate Change Mitigation Projects (Parts I and II)

Name(s) of session chair(s):


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  How to Conserve Biodiversity in Climate Change Mitigation Projects (Parts I and II)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

George C. Ledec


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

--A “just transformation” needs to be biodiversity-friendly (aka nature-safe), not just socially just.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

--Low-carbon does not mean low-impact from a biodiversity standpoint. A wide range of “green” energy projects (including large and small hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass) need to be carefully assessed for their (sometimes severe) biodiversity impacts at the earliest stages of project and sectoral planning (including when power purchase agreements are negotiated).

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

--The ongoing planning of massive “green hydrogen” projects is targeting some of the world’s most wild and pristine coastlines (such as in Namibia) for very extensive solar and wind power development, along with large-scale industrial facilities and new human settlements. Conserving biodiversity in this context will require early, up-front impact assessment focused on the biodiversity at risk from such development and the development of large-scale and well-funded conservation offsets, set-asides, and species monitoring. To energy planners, large, sparsely populated areas like coastal Namibia may seem like good “empty spaces” for locating sprawling new infrastructure, but a closer look shows that there is much globally unique biodiversity.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

--Some biodiversity mitigation measures (such as wind turbine shut-downs on demand to protect birds of conservation concern) may be carefully designed but then inconsistently implemented. Accordingly, impact assessment practitioners need to ensure that the incentives and enforcement mechanisms are in place for project operators to follow the required good practices.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

--The on-line Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (IBAT) provides useful first-approximation biodiversity data for a project area, but it needs to be supplemented with project-area field work to ensure that the biodiversity information used for decision-making is adequate and up to date.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

--The world faces an urgent climate change crisis, but it also faces an urgent biodiversity loss crisis that is no less compelling. Accordingly, renewable energy and other climate change mitigation projects need to be planned, built, and operated in ways that help to conserve biodiversity, rather than destroying it.


Session Name:  Human Rights Impact Assessment for a Just Transition

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Gabriela Factor, Tulika Bansal


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

- Human rights impact assessment practice is increasing in the just transformation space. - The diversity of issues in the just transition requires different approaches and methodologies, and common all of them is to put rightsholders at the center. - Human rights impact assessment provides a number of benefits to the impact assessment and management processes, including the consideration of a broader scope of people e.g., workers and users. - Digital technologies are applied both in the just transition, and in impact assessment practices, with potential human rights impacts that need to be further explored and considered.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

The human rights lens allows for a strengthening of the companies responsibility to address impacts because of reference to international legal frameworks, and allows discussion on difficult issues like forced labor and gender based violence in the just transformation. There was a call for further integration of human rights in impact assessment.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The sector wide human rights impact assessment in La Guajira illustrates the potential for addressing the impacts of the wind-sector at the regional level in a context of very vulnerable populations and can help shape policies, strategies, and projects by government and companies, but also the voice of civil society.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

New developments in human rights due diligence regulation and certification are driving more and better human rights assessments in the just transition.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Prioritize diversity in your team that includes human rights capacity, and make sure that the organization commissioning the impact assessment has a commitment and understanding of human rights.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Human Rights in impact assessment has tools for strengthening impact assessment practice and better decision making for the “just” in the transition.


Session Name:  IA for better policy-making: Current trends and new methods

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Zishu Wang


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Complexities lead high uncertainties for IA processes. More efforts should be made to enhance effectiveness for making decisions

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

System thinking and digital approaches can be sufficient for IA processes. Health impact assessment, digital EIA, social impact assessment, and policy effectiveness evaluation should be conducted to support better policy-making.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Based on 9 presentations from 8 different countries, we agreed that more concerns about stakeholders, careful arguments for IA reports can enhance IA effectiveness for a just transformation.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

IA has been an sufficient tool for policy-making. The new trends of IA including HIA, digital EIA, SIA, institutional impact assessment, and policy effectiveness evaluation, and so on.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

More concerns about stakeholders, careful arguments for IA reports, and more adoptions of digital technologies (e.g., big data, AI, etc.).


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Policy makers must realize the necessity and complexity of IA processes. System thinking and process-based evaluation are strongly recommended.


Session Name:  IAiA principles for AI in IA

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Charlotte Bingham


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Not applicable

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

.not applicable

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Not applicable


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Very important to clarify role of AI in impact assessment


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Transparency and responsible use of AI


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Did not discuss


Session Name:  IAiA principles for AI in IA

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Charlotte Bingham


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Not applicable

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

.not applicable

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Not applicable


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Very important to clarify role of AI in impact assessment


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Transparency and responsible use of AI


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Did not discuss


Session Name:  Impact Assessment and Adaptive Management for Climate Change Ⅰ & Ⅱ

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Guoqing Shi; Chen Chen


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

It's a multi-level, multi-regional issue. Different presenters of different countries showed different achievements and efforts to achieve a just transition, and various institutions such as consultant companies and international banks also contribute to the field. In general, EIA has been widely accepted, while SIA and other IA are expected.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

1. government's attention 2. laws and regulations 3. financial regulation

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

In general, the government of many countries mainly focus on the national level or regional level impacts, while lack the concern of a community level or personal level, which results in the neglect of social and institutional issues in the process of achieving SDGs.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

/


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

/


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

/


Session Name:  Impacts and risks of the REE and lithium supply chain

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Simon Catchpole


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

For lithium mining, impact assessment needs to be broadened from the project-based assessment to the basin-wide assessment, and even to a regional, multi-jurisdictional assessment for lithium mining in the Central Andes. Regulatory authorities must validate that actual E&S performance is in line with original E&S approvals. New technologies for mining, processing and manufacturing that are currently in development promise safer lithium and safer battery production, but are untested. Therefore, they must be welcomed, but applied with caution. All stakeholders in the supply chain have a part to play in the just transformation, including regulatory authorities, extractive industry, manufacturing, recycling industry, civil society action groups, and end use purchasers.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Environmental and social science applied to the appropriate scales of evaluation. Education and engagement of affected communities. Empowered regulatory authorities. Commercial and regulatory space for experimentation with new technologies.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Large scale initiatives require large scale planning. Impact assessment will translate to effective E&S management only if actors in the supply chain are held accountable for their actions.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

A life cycle assessment is appropriate for an SEA for REE or Lithium.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Look at the regional, accumulated effects.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Do an SEA for lithium production in your producing region. Involve stakeholders in the upstream supply chain. Look for ways to promote recycling of critical materials in your manufacturing or consuming region. Involve stakeholders in the downstream supply chain.


Session Name:  Indigenous perspectives on a just transformation (I-IV)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Dr Diana Lewis, Dr Dyanna Jolly


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1. Development has significantly impacted Indigenous communities and their territories. Impact assessment processes and outcomes have failed to protect Indigenous rights, health, culture, economies and relationships to land and water. 2. Indigenous nations and communities are taking control and developing solutions. They are generating their own IA data, often supported by researchers, scientists and others who are able and willing to work in relational and collaborative ways; in hearts and minds processes. 3. What we heard: The energy transition – IA needs to transform before we can have a just transformation. Otherwise more of the same.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Just transformations for Indigenous Peoples and the protection of their lands, waters and resources requires IA processes that recognise Indigenous sovereignty, jurisdiction, autonomy, rights, knowledges and processes.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

When nations and communities generate their own data, the impact assessment will reflect the reality of impacts, and not a proponent or consultant interpretation or assessment of effects. This is the only way to address the significant and shocking impact of development on Indigenous communities – impacts that IA has failed to address. The challenge is how the information is received by decision-makers. Do they know what to do with Indigenous IA data? Do they have the competency to use the data to make good decisions?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  Innovative data sharing and governance for a a just transformation (1) and (2)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Andy CHUNG, Clara U, Kin-Che LAM


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

We need a lot of data for analysis to inform decision-making. Hence, we need innovation in data gathering, analysis and discourse. There is a need for platform to hold the data and for sharing with stakeholders.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Data integrity, transparency, sharing, and accessibility to decision-makers, IA professionals and concerned public.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

We heard from 10 presenters about their experience in providing such data for shaping policies and public involvement. All inforrnative and insightful.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Data is of pivotal importance to policy making. Impact assessment can help evaluate policies and development options. In addition to data gathering and analysis, it is high time also to consider the use of innovative IT and AI for our tasks.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Use data platforms to provide the needed data and information for decision-making, and for engaging the public. There should be ways to ensure accessibility and data integrity and to maintain such data platform for use.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Use data platforms to engage the public, inform them of policies and development options. Be aware that provision of such data can help improve project designs and build trust in the project teams and the government.


Session Name:  Innovative data sharing and governance for a a just transformation (1) and (2)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Andy CHUNG, Clara U, Kin-Che LAM


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

We need a lot of data for analysis to inform decision-making. Hence, we need innovation in data gathering, analysis and discourse. There is a need for platform to hold the data and for sharing with stakeholders.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Data integrity, transparency, sharing, and accessibility to decision-makers, IA professionals and concerned public.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

We heard from 10 presenters about their experience in providing such data for shaping policies and public involvement. All inforrnative and insightful.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Data is of pivotal importance to policy making. Impact assessment can help evaluate policies and development options. In addition to data gathering and analysis, it is high time also to consider the use of innovative IT and AI for our tasks.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Use data platforms to provide the needed data and information for decision-making, and for engaging the public. There should be ways to ensure accessibility and data integrity and to maintain such data platform for use.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Use data platforms to engage the public, inform them of policies and development options. Be aware that provision of such data can help improve project designs and build trust in the project teams and the government.


Session Name:  Innovative data sharing and governance for a a just transformation (1) and (2)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Andy CHUNG, Clara U, Kin-Che LAM


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

We need a lot of data for analysis to inform decision-making. Hence, we need innovation in data gathering, analysis and discourse. There is a need for platform to hold the data and for sharing with stakeholders.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Data integrity, transparency, sharing, and accessibility to decision-makers, IA professionals and concerned public.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

We heard from 10 presenters about their experience in providing such data for shaping policies and public involvement. All inforrnative and insightful.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Data is of pivotal importance to policy making. Impact assessment can help evaluate policies and development options. In addition to data gathering and analysis, it is high time also to consider the use of innovative IT and AI for our tasks.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Use data platforms to provide the needed data and information for decision-making, and for engaging the public. There should be ways to ensure accessibility and data integrity and to maintain such data platform for use.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Use data platforms to engage the public, inform them of policies and development options. Be aware that provision of such data can help improve project designs and build trust in the project teams and the government.


Session Name:  Innovative Data Sharing and Governance for a Just Transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Andy Chung, Clara U, Kin Che Lam


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Enhanced Data Accessibility and Transparency - Accessible data platforms can significantly improve the efficiency and fairness of environmental impact assessments (EIAs). By making data readily available, stakeholders gain a better understanding of potential environmental impacts, which facilitates more informed and streamlined decision-making processes. Innovative Use of Technology in Environmental Management - The application of cutting-edge technologies, such as GIS, blockchain, and IoT, when integrated into environmental governance, improves data accuracy and enables real-time monitoring and proactive environmental management. Public Participation and Education - Public access to environmental data is important. Making complex information understandable and accessible enhances community engagement and empowerment, leading to more inclusive and accepted decision-making processes.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Robust Data Governance - Ensure the integrity, accuracy, and security of data through clear protocols and structured management. Use high-quality, reliable data to inform all aspects of impact assessment, ensuring that decisions are based on accurate and current information. Transparency and Accessibility - Make information readily available and understandable to all stakeholders, thus enhancing transparency. Facilitate open access to information so that all stakeholders, including the public, can review and contribute to discussions, ensuring that decisions are made transparently. Use of Advanced Technologies - Leverage technologies like GIS, blockchain, and IoT to improve the accuracy and efficiency of environmental monitoring and impact assessments. Utilize technology to provide detailed and precise environmental assessments, which can aid in making more informed and effective decisions regarding environmental and community impacts.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The use of comprehensive data systems enhances the EIA process by providing detailed baseline and monitoring data, which streamlines assessments and planning processes. The integration of advanced technologies such as blockchain aids in real-time data management. However, challenges such as balancing data accessibility with the protection of sensitive information were noted, underscoring the importance of robust data governance. Effective governance in data sharing can build trust in impact assessments and improve stakeholder engagement. The need for cross-sectoral and cross-border collaboration was emphasized to enhance the exchange of knowledge and experience. It is crucial to continually innovate in impact assessments to effectively address the complexities of environmental challenges. Impact assessments are essential tools for enhancing transparency and informed participation, enabling stakeholders to understand potential environmental impacts.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Continual efforts should be made to refine the quality of impact assessments through the use of verified data.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Stay flexible, continuously adapting to emerging technologies and methodologies.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

For Policy Makers - Implement IA at the early stage of the policy development process. For Business Leaders - Adopt IA as a tool to shape corporate strategies. For Technology Providers - Develop and offer tools that facilitate comprehensive and efficient impact assessments.


Session Name:  It’s a beautiful day for social and human rights IA: EU too play a role

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Ana Maria Esteves, Francesco Tricoli


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

The new pieces of EU legislation have the potential to foster just transformation. CSRD and its comprehensive sustainability reporting requirements are based on materiality assessment of a company’s internal and external impacts which is aimed to achieve the objectives of promoting sustainable investments, enhancing corporate ESG performance and ultimately mitigating risks for people and the environment. To make the most of it, it is crucial to overcome challenges, solve methodological questions, seek the right skills, incorporate processes into corporate management systems, and understand how HRIAs and ESHIAs can best contribute to the materiality assessment.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

- Considering a standardisation of the thresholds associated with assessing the materiality of impacts based on severity and likelihood and category of impacts. - Matching the right skills: business acumen is needed to understand the complexity of value chains, interpersonal skills to conduct meaningful stakeholder engagement, analytical skills to understand and interpret data; expertise in a broad range of sustainability matters including impacts on end-users and consumers. - Integrating impact materiality assessment and sustainability reporting into management systems. It is crucial to have an endorsement by the board; remove silos by engaging cross-functional working groups; clearly define responsibilities and allocate appropriate resource; foster collaboration and engagement with direct and indirect business partners within the value chain; and monitor the effectiveness of these processes. - Understanding the extent to which HRIA and ESHIA can contribute to impact materiality assessment under CSRD. Challenges identified are the scope of sustainability topics to consider (e.g., consideration of impacts on consumers and end-users); coverage of the entire value chain (global vs. project-specific impacts); timeframe of assessment (point-in-time assessment vs. iterative assessment), among others. It is crucial that the impact assessment is structured within clearly defined ToRs.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

- The CSRD legally requires numerous European companies to identify and address environmental, social and human rights impacts associated with their operations and supply chain. This holds tremendous opportunities for IA practitioners to support organizations embed standardized processes that will identify, avoid, manage and address impacts associated with business operations in a manner that directly supports just transformation


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Impact materiality assessment is a key step to be taken for effective disclosure on sustainability issues under CSRD and the success of its objectives. It is important to capitalise on the strategic opportunities the Directive presents for pushing the sustainability agenda forward and ultimately, pursuing just transformation. This must be done by viewing CSRD requirements as a meaningful opportunity to promote company-wide sustainability objectives and not a reporting burden.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Engage with other practitioners and contribute to an open dialogue on the implications of CSRD/ESRSs on impact assessment and discuss solutions for overcoming identified challenges.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Provide guidance on how to implement CRSD/ESRSs with the aim of standardising best practices based on open consultation.


Session Name:  Just Transformation of Infrastructure Projects (III)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Camille Heaton


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Consider including ESMP at the beginning of the ESIA process. Tailings don't need topsoil to have plants growing on them. Solar, wind and Hydropower all have major environmental and social issues that we need to consider and keep working on--how to clean the supply chain.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Focus more on Management Plan aspects of ESIAs. Management plans are critical. Consider innovative methods for remediation. Keep trying to green the supply chain to reduce impacts from solar, wind and hydropower.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Impact assessment is only as good as the management plans after--using the management plans as part of the ESIA process can right-size the ESIA. Ensure silica, cobalt and other key inputs to wind and solar are considered--including the use of child and forced labor.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

We should exert political pressure regarding mining of silica and cobalt.


Session Name:  Large infrastructures, just transition, and community health and safety (I & II)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Francesca Viliani, Mark Divall


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Health and well-being are central dimensions of the just transformation. Systematically identifying and avoiding or eliminating inequities resulting from any differences in health and in overall living conditions that might arise due to the energy transition is necessary to enable a just transition. However, health is still not adequately addressed in Impact Assessment.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Involvement of health stakeholders in the impact assessment as early as possible is fundamental to generate an informed decision making process. Capacity building of health stakeholders and practitioners is essential to ensure their meaningful contributions in impact assessment. Connections between energy, climate, health, and human rights are under-researched and more needs to be done to provide evidence that can be used in impact assessment and by decision makers. Many impacts from renewable energy projects are (i) not commonly known and (ii) not yet known. This applies especially to the supply chain and the commissioning phase. Impact assessments and impact assessors will be the main persons that have to make sure these are considered in the projects and managed proactively. And health seems to be the least addressed aspect.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Health and safety processes should be adjusted to ensure they are applicable to new energy technologies. The process of HIA needs to be adapted for just transformation as well: e.g. screening criteria for projects might be different, topics of equity, environmental justice and cumulative impacts need to be better integrated into hia. Companies are working on this so the dialogue with practitioners, decision makers and council society should be strengthened. Ral life public private partnerships with academics, private companies, and public health agencies working together and sharing experience in driving the field of hia forward. this will allow to combine the evidence based approach from academia and innovation within the private sector HIA is evolving and robust methodologies were presented and should be more widely disseminated to facilitate ongoing improvements Baseline and monitoring data are central in impact assessment, they might require ad hoc collection approaches. But whenever possible should be done with the goal of strengthening the health system.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Health is central to any transformation, more discussion across disciplines and actors is fundamental


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Call you health buddy and get them to assist in ensuring that health is covered in the impact assessment More integration in the approach may be needed, silos still exist and are apparent even at IAIA conference when it comes to human rights, environment, social, impact assessments and hia. More opportunities to collaborate at company, consultancy levels and across iaia. consider what makes hia 'effective', go beyond just good process i.e. following the steps of hia.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

lack of requirements for hia remains a challenge to promote it in all sectors


Session Name:  Linking urban health and SDGs through impact assessment

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Emanuel Valpacos


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

The session highlighted the critical role of impact assessments (IAs) in achieving just and sustainable urban health transformations. Key lessons included the necessity of integrating IAs across sectors to comprehensively address health, environmental, and social determinants; the importance of forward-looking, adaptive policies informed by IAs to anticipate and mitigate future urban health challenges; and the role of IAs in promoting equity by ensuring that health policies comprehensively address the needs of vulnerable populations, thereby reducing health disparities.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

To ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, several key factors were discussed in the session. Firstly, it is essential to adopt an integrative, contextualized, and equity-oriented approach to urban health that encompasses all stakeholders, raises collective awareness of risks and opportunities, and fosters collaboration toward unified goals. Secondly, impact assessments should be used to identify potential negative impacts of urban development on health and design appropriate mitigation/compensation measures. Thirdly, impact assessments should be instrumental and conceptual, clarifying expected changes in behavior, identifying co-benefits, and raising awareness among stakeholders about the multiple effects of urban health policies. These factors can be applied in decision-making by incorporating impact assessments into urban planning and policy-making processes, engaging stakeholders in the assessment process, and using the findings to inform decision-making.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The discussion on sanitation highlighted how environmental licensing, informed by IAs, can lead to better decision-making, illustrating the potential for new approaches and the design of fairer mitigation/compensation measures. The study on PM10 concentrations and land use underscored how IAs can guide urban planning and land use decisions, directly influencing public health and environmental quality. The expansion of walking policies through IAs demonstrated how urban planning can enhance health equity and accessibility, showcasing how IAs can be instrumental in linking physical health improvements with broader urban development goals, in supporting the identification of co-benefits and in raising awareness among stakeholders about the multiple effects of such policies. During the session, the challenges faced in implementing IAs, such as the need for adequate resources, technical expertise, and political will, were acknowledged. To overcome these challenges, it was emphasized the importance of engaging stakeholders in the assessment process, building capacity for impact assessment, and fostering a culture of evidence-based decision-making.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

- Emphasize stakeholder engagement and capacity building to ensure effective and inclusive impact assessments. - Foster a culture of evidence-based decision-making by promoting transparency and data-driven approaches in impact assessment processes. - Address the challenges of resource constraints and political will by collaborating with diverse stakeholders and advocating for the integration of impact assessments in policy and decision-making processes.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

- Prioritize the integration of impact assessments in policy and decision-making processes to promote just and sustainable urban development. - Foster collaboration and stakeholder engagement to ensure comprehensive and inclusive impact assessments.


Session Name:  Making follow-up happen to transform IA practice

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Jos Arts and Angus Morrison-Saunders


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

- IAIA’s international best practice principles for IA follow-up IA follow-up and the accompanying guidance document are endorsed by the attendants - IA follow-up is needed for a just transition - In cases of development involving land resettlement IA follow-up should also carefully involve with local / resettled communities - Follow-up should have a forward-looking element (feeding in new SEA / EIA cycles)

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

institutional capacity, finance, enable learning, central info repository well accessible for all stakeholders, good baseline monitoring

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

IA Follow-up is about commitments (not about ‘promised’ environmental and social measures) IA follow-up is needed to bridge the auditing and expectation gap


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

From the presenters’ messages, To make follow-up happen, we need: - Cathy Mackay (Canada) - centralised data - Charlene Smith (Malta) – understanding governance processes, arrangements and mechanisms is vital in making IA follow-up happen - Alberto Fonseca (Brazil) – having mandatory follow-up is not enough, we also need guidance - Wout van der Gun (the Netherlands) – Follow-up needs a careful start phase with a plan of action. Followup has more added value if it serves multiple purposes. Check usability of existing data at early stage. Ensure followup is embedded in the organisation. Present follow-up separately from IA. Use the EIA as an instrument for determining what kind of follow-up is needed, instead of focusing too much on checking the EIA. - Anni Karkkainen (Finland) – minimum requirements for follow-up need to be laid down in the EIA/permit legislation - Randeep Singh Saini (India) – [recognise that] regulatory enforcement is different to follow-up - Leyla Ozay (Uganda + Kenya) – have clear roles and responsibilities for compliance monitoring. Translate ESMPs into formal conditions (ie outcomes that are quantified). Informal monitoring is important. Deliberate efforts to improve ESMPs, translate into legal conditions. Dedicated departments with mechanisms for coordination and collaboration are needed. Legal enforcement may not get us there: (i) proponent self regulation and motivation is key, (ii) transparency [is needed, eg so NGOs can take action], (iii) recognise and reinforce the role of civil society”. - Cristian Perez (Chile) – There is a need to have some mechanisms to address change in environmental variables arising from the EIA process. Legal instruments and proceedings must be adaptive to evolving situations, particularly considering changing scenarios such as the one imposed by climate change; and also, must take in account what is on stake. In this context structure of the review process and its associated timing have some space for improvement. - Natalia Takahashi Margarido (Brazil) - Accurate description oof impacts is essential. Compliance reports do not necessarily seek to determine the magnitude of impacts or evaluate mitigation effectiveness. But when monitoring was targeted at supporting impact mitigation, an integrated approach has proved to be capable of promoting an effective and adaptive management of biodiversity impacts. Adoption of biodiversity targets as an opportunity to deepen the analysis of already available data and transform them into information of interest to a range of stakeholders. - Vitus Tankpa (Ghana) – the active participation of the affected communities [in the case of resettled communities] is key to the successful implementation of the mitigation measures for social and environmental aspects - [Theunis Meyer (South Africa, attending the workshop, having a IA follow-up related presentation earlier at the conference – the auditing gap or expectation gap, i.e. what follow-up is meant to do and what it can actually do are not aligned.]


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

See above.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

See above.


Session Name:  Marine Impact Assessments for Ecosystem-based Maritime Spatial Planning

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Donald Maynard


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

The five presentations were on the theme of Marine Impact Assessments for Ecosystem-based Maritime Spatial Planning however there were two sub-groups. Three presentations on marine activity/spatial analysis methods (using available data sets) in impact assessment and two presentations in providing a review and analysis of spatial planning conducted on marine projects to identify successes and areas requiring improvement. The activity/spatial analysis methods presentations provided tools to produce project design options however each presenter clearly recognized that stakeholder input was required to successfully conduct an impact assessment with a just transformation. The presentations with review and analysis of spatial planning conducted on marine projects also emphasized the necessity of social/cultural/stakeholder inputs in to the impact assessment process for a just transformation.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

The common and key factor from each of the presentations was the need to have a meaningful input from stakeholders into the results of any impact assessment in order to have credibility with the public. The importance of early engagement with the public and were possible providing project design/component options as part of the engagement. The presentations that reviewed and provided analysis of spatial planning conducted on marine projects also related the importance of adaptive management in the design/construction/operation of the project.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The session illustrated potential advances in impact assessment methods while at the same time confirming the need for stakeholder/social/cultural inputs in order to achieve a just transformation.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Stakeholder input must be conducted and factored into impact assessment.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

As impact assessment tools/methods evolve there must still be a stakeholder/social/cultural input for the public to have confidence in the impact accessment process and support steps in a just transformation.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Policy makers and stakeholders must be willing to engage and provide input into impact assessment processes to realize a just transformation.


Session Name:  Meaningful Impact Assessments through Indigenous Leadership

Name(s) of session chair(s):

James Herbert


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Indigenous frameworks are an important lesson in guiding holistic impact assessment with an emphasis on understanding impacts and decision making through complex relationships.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Understanding the worldview and guiding principles from the knowledge of people who have developed their strategies for stewardship and management is the key to transformation of IA practices.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Understanding how people interact with impacts on the ground through Indigenous Monitoring programs, and the way of thinking about pathways of effects that flows from Indigenous laws is a much better framework to look at how impact assessments can be more relevant to the communities that development projects affect.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

There's is a need for practitioners to look toward the number of different projects and frameworks developed by Indigenous communities in order to help developed new and target assessment tools.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Policy makers need to incorporate specific community developed frameworks and impact assessment processes into their decision-making. Stakeholders, specifically industry, would benefit from understanding these policies and building applications and proponent information to meet these standards.


Session Name:  Meaningful public participation in impact assessment

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Tanya Burdett and Timothy Peirson-Smith


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

o Meaningful public participation is critical and comprises 10 essential elements plus contextual elements of 1-indigenous rights, lands and processes; 2-international agreements and goals; and national, regional and local context o Within these there are important lessons for factors such as doing engagement well at scale, considering climate change, emphasising the importance of communications, particularly visual/digital/,

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

• Key factors discussed and how they can be applied in decision-making – o Opportunities for communities making decisions? (in the context of existing IA process); building in early opportunities at pre-project stages (and pre-SEA / strategy conception), consultation fatigue

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

o Patricia - Difficulties and practicalities of cross-border (i.e., transboundary, cross-boundary and multi-jurisdictional) assessment to enabling meaningful public participation. o Ana - perceptions and experiences of proponents and members of the public with regards visual communication in EIA, noting pre-conceived notions for visual communication, without considering the needs of their audience, resulting in complex content being delivered inappropriately o unique challenges presented in meaningfully communicating, engaging and fostering public participation with large and diverse audiences, and on mega projects (Tim)


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

o When asked to respond to the 10 essential elements, and suggest one which is viewed as most critical, participants who responded to the menti survey overwhelmingly said access to public hearings and information dispute resolution, opportunity for comment, access to information (all foundational elements in the framework presented in the session), then early and ongoing, open and transparent (both part of 6 essential elements) and indigenous rights, land and processes (one of three contextual elements). o On reflecting on the presentations, participants suggested key aspects of meaningful PP also needs to include transparency, resources, meeting communities where they’re at, more thoughtful consideration of context, visuals, follow up consultation, resources and patience


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

o Note the emerging framework that draws on IAIA membership surveys, ~40 contributing authors reviewing components of best practice PP in IA, a thorough review of myriad international frameworks including IAP2, IAIA, lending institutions suggestions for what makes for meaningful PP.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

o As above, note the emerging framework.


Session Name:  Methods for handling complexity in Just Transformation (I)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Charlotta Faith-Ell and Johanna Gordon


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

That many practitioners mistake the IA process for a method of assessing complexity. The only concrete methods for handling complexity in IA was systems analysis and strategic thinking.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

In order to move forward with regards to complexity and handling of cumulative effects, a systems approach is needed. Need for inventing the instruments instead of following the conventional pathways. One identified problem was the attitude to pile up data rather then defining problems and finding answers.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Examples on projects highlighting the social and cultural component as well as circularity.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

In order to move forward with regards to complexity and handling of cumulative effects, a systems approach is needed.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

There is a need to develop methods for handling complexity within the IA processes. And training practitioners.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

There is a need to apply methods for handling complexity within the IA processes.


Session Name:  Methods for handling complexity in Just Transformation (II)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Charlotta Faith-Ell and Johanna Gordon


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

That many practitioners mistake the IA process for a method of assessing complexity. The only concrete methods for handling complexity in IA was systems analysis and strategic thinking.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

In order to move forward with regards to complexity and handling of cumulative effects, a systems approach is needed. Need for inventing the instruments instead of following the conventional pathways. One identified problem was the attitude to pile up data rather then defining problems and finding answers.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Examples on projects highlighting the social and cultural component as well as circularity.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

In order to move forward with regards to complexity and handling of cumulative effects, a systems approach is needed.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

There is a need to develop methods for handling complexity within the IA processes. And training practitioners.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

There is a need to apply methods for handling complexity within the IA processes.


Session Name:  Nature Positive Outcomes through a Just Transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Amrei von Hase


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1. Governments need to create a progressive and robust regulatory system, based on best policy and practice in the mitigation hierarchy. This will support ambitions to achieve genuine no net loss/ net gain and nature positive outcomes. The level of ambition needs to change drastically within companies, government and society as a whole. 2. There is a need to use innovative methods to upscale the collection, processing and sharing of biodiversity data and train users in applying this to good decision-making. 3. We are still talking mostly about making incremental changes to policy and practice, but seem far away from what it takes to make transformative change happen.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

- Preparation of sound regulations on NNL/NG of biodiversity in line with international best practice, taking into account direct, indirect and cumulative impacts of all impacting sectors - Good biodiversity data prepared at the national level and shared publicly that is used in IA - Courageous decision-making by regulators regarding impact avoidance - Training and capacity building of stakeholders in IA and beyond to understand and apply Net Gain approaches - Finding effective ways to involve local communities and nature stewards in conservation and compensation delivery

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

- Example: Training of IA practitioners (and many others) in best practice in the mitigation hierarchy and NNL/ NG - Challenge: Reaching a critical number of IA practitioners well versed in the approaches and rigorously applying them. - Another challenge: aligning timelines of corporate planning and decision-making and IA


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

- Radically increased awareness of the need to align with practice that helps meet global targets for biodiversity - There is a need fundamentally to shift mindsets from limiting impacts to enabling transformation


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

- Be brave in holding the line for biodiversity - that is our job! - Be ambitious for biodiversity


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  No Longer on Margins: Toward Social and Climate Justice in Solid Waste Management Sector

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Harjot Kaur


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Holistic approaches that integrate Government action, private sector engagement, awareness generation, community participation in decision-making, and respect for the rights of the waste pickers will contribute to climate and social justice to these workers. Efforts towards monitoring and assessment of their work conditions should include a dialogue with waste pickers allowing them to share their intergenerational knowledge for accelerating climate change mitigation and just transformation.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

The initiatives supporting improving solid waste management need to ensure that the impacts of such initiatives on the waste pickers working in the sector are properly assessed early on and these workers provided with the opportunities to work of the newer jobs in the sector through their skill training and are linked to other schemes of the Government for alternate livelihood. A meaningful consultation with these workers will help in effective impact mitigation and grievance resolution. Synergizing their traditional skills with efforts to mechanize waste collection will contribute to safeguarding their interests as well environment.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Several examples were presented in the session for stronger institutional mechanisms for dignity & voice of the waste pickers, greater possibilities for their inclusion into SWM systems & policies, facilitating access to services & entitlements and recognition of women waste pickers’ roles and concerns. These included recognizing them as green agents in Argentina, initiatives of REDI, a social enterprise in North Macedonia helping to organize and employ Roma informal waste collectors, while establishing a system for primary waste separation in households and companies and Columbia’s pioneering public litigation for recognition of waste pickers, all of them helping to shape policies and strategies.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

The initiatives in solid waste management sector need to assess the overall impacts of these activities on the communities whose livelihood is dependent on this sector. These may include waste pickers, workers in recycling units, those who are working at incinerators etc. The working conditions of these workers also need to be assessed properly and improved to provide them with safer ways of waste picking through provision of PPEs, awareness generation, provision of medical care facilities etc.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Assess for any child or forced labor concerns; understand safety and other basic needs of the women waste pickers and provide for them with enabling environment such as availability of easily accessible grievance redressal mechanisms, child care centers near the places they work, separate toilet facilities at dumping sites and; availability of alternate livelihood for these workers in the wake of mechanization of their work.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

• Legal and policy reform to ensure recognition of roles of waste pickers in cleaning our spaces and waste management systems and provision of protective and social protection measures. • Engage integration of waste pickers into municipal SWM systems • Collaborate with private sector for providing alternate and safer work conditions to waste pickers • Dialogue among the different stakeholders for an integrated approach to move the needle for safer and decent work conditions to waste pickers


Session Name:  Opportunities for development cooperation to go beyond no-significant-harm.

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Lead: Juan Palerm Co-chair: Gunilla Ölund Wingqvist


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

In order to contribute to a just transformation, development cooperation must (as must other actors) go beyond do-no-harm. It could be done by complementing project-level IA with more upstream approaches (such as SEA) where there are opportunities for more strategic considerations. Three aspects are important to promote a just green transformation: o Scope – or the magnitude of change. Sustainability needs to be embedded in everything that we do. o Pace – we need to speed up the transformation. o Quality of change – the change needs to be both green and just. For transformation to happen, legislation, rules, regulations, etc, are necessary, but not sufficient. They also need to be implemented. Implementation is promoted in various ways, for instance through: o the EU taxonomy, which is a framework to avoid greenwashing, supports clarity and establishes a framework for financing institutions and the greening of finance,. o Access to information, for instance related to identifying and tracking financial flows for biodiversity at country level and matching with national needs for finance. o The importance of genuine local ownership what highlighted for real changes to happen. Efforts to match local researchers with local capacity needs seem to be effective (instead of flying in international experts) o Implementation is also promoted through systematic monitoring and follow-up. o Also other types of support can promote implementation, such tools, methods support, etc. The European Commission are about to launch a “Greening Toolbox” with open access.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

It would be good with clarity and definitions, for instance in relation to the EU taxonomy: what do we mean with DNH and DNSH (what is significant harm)? Mandatory or voluntary – taxonomy-alignment is voluntary, using the green toolbox as well. It could be good to mix the mandatory aspects (the stick) with different kinds of support (carrots), to reduce implementation gap and the capacity gap. • Both carrots and sticks should be used: o Sticks: for instance:  requirement of reporting of EU taxonomy alignment,  monitoring and follow up (various levels) o Carrots:  support, such as relevant, available and accessible tools and methods support (e.g. the EU greening toolbox)  information, such as tracking finance flows to biodiversity  capacity building support

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Impact Assessment remains a key tool to inform decision-making consistent with a just transformation. However, it traditionally focuses on the ‘do no harm’ side of the equation by addressing potential environmental and social impacts. To some extent IA can be enhanced to inform ‘do more good’ decisions, but more generally IA has to be used in conjunction with other approaches and tools to better address positive contributions. For example, the use of taxonomies for sustainable finance (e.g. EU Taxonomy) and of biodiversity finance (e.g. GLOBE taxonomy of UNDP).


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Even though we must work more upstream, the project level EIA continues to be important. Continued capacity development on impact assessment. Given the increased provision of development cooperation aid in collaboration with financial institutions in the form of blended finance, efforts must be made to bring the IA and sustainable finance communities of practice together (e.g. starting from issues of language which is often a barrier).


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Practitioners must always keep in mind that their work must contribute to a green and just transformation. In that sense they must be aware of the decision-making processes that their work will influence to bring further added value.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

More focus on monitoring of the implementation of the recommendations of the assessments (SEA, EIA, etc) would promote implementation and accountability. Continue to work with making the taxonomy easy to understand and utilize, for instance through clarifying what “significant harm” is.


Session Name:  Pathways to Biodiversity Net Gain 1, II, III

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Jo Treweek


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Need for transparent, inclusive and evidence-based approaches for safeguarding biodiversity, ecosystems and the benefits they provide to people. Need for committing to enhancement and shared responsibility for historic losses, restoring ecosystems and contributing to net gain.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

IA is important to develop a robust evidence base and provide a framework for making nature positive commitments and obtaining the data needed to deliver them.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Many people,including future generations, depend on bodiversity or value it highly.There is a debt to repay.... Businesses recognise the need to contribute to biodiversity net gan or nature positive outcomes and are seeking methods and metrics that can support then in their efforts to be accountable. These need to address the needs of species, integrity of ecosystems and their structure and function, as well as the benefits derived and depended on by people.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

There has been a welcome shift from damage limitation to outcome oriented approaches and credible, evidence-based methods are needed to support this transition, including landscape-scale approaches.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Tailor methods and metrics to your context, building on existing experiences.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Clear commitments to BNG/ nature positive are welcomed if requirements and regulations are clear. Spatial policies and prioritisation are needed tonsure that biodiversity gains delivered in relation to individual projects also contribute to wider goals for biodiversity


Session Name:  Post-ESIA Contractor Management and Value Creation: What Drives Success?

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Eleanor Gill


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

IAs need to be translated into contractor requirements to properly implement mitigation. There is a balance between carrot and stick approach when incentivizing contractors to implement ESIA requirements. Engagement and collaboration with contractors is central to contractor performance.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Enforceability of ESIA conclusions and mitigations. Local procurement, employment, training and capacity building for local communities impacted by projects.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Use ESIA results to determine E&S bonds that contractors must be up-front to protect against non-compliance. Early planning to ensure ESIA results embedded in contractor procurement processes. Saturation monitoring - over communicate, over monitor, over audit contractors to drive results.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Seek to understand how ESIA results will be passed on to contractors, to ensure mitigation identified is implementable.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Consider jurisdiction-level requirements for codifying ESIA conclusions to drive implementation.


Session Name:  Practical cases on cumulative impact assessment in the Global South

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Juan Carlos Páez Zamora


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Cumulative impact assessment and management (CIAM) is a process, not a single-short exercise. CIAM is a must when there are several projects being executed in the same location. Even though renewable energy projects can be labeled as “green”, they may not be so green after factoring in cumulative impacts.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

While EIA is necessary to conceiving sustainable projects, it is not sufficient. A wider approach that factors-in the effects of other past, ongoing, and future projects must also be performed. The determination of future projects to be considered in the analysis is perhaps the most challenging task while performing CIAM. CIAM needs to be monitored and updated regularly.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

It is always advisable to use several impact identification instruments to better determine the overall effect of projects. There is no single way to undertake a sound impact identification and evaluation process.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Some instruments need to be “tropicalized” to adjust to specific in-country situations.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Always use a combination of instruments and methodologies to predict future environmental and social conditions and to assess their overall effects.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Even though CIAM can be undertaken from a single project perspective, the implementation of its mitigation plan always requires the coordination (and the muscle) of the relevant authorities.


Session Name:  Principles for Social Inclusion through Impact Assessment

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Sara Bice and Emerson Sanchez


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1. Many vulnerable communities will unequally bear the trade-offs necessary for the transformation. 2. We must co-design the transformation with them, using principles of fairness and inclusion, engaging as early as possible and with a willingness to hear and work through opposition. 3. Participatory, unbiased, fair, safe and context-specific impact assessment has a critical role to play in fostering social inclusion through the transformation.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

The Session built on case studies from Australia, Argentina, Nigeria and Canada to rapidly draft Basic and Operating Principles for Social Inclusion for Impact Assessment. These draft principles will be presented to IAIA as an opportunity to support IAIA members' best practice in recognising and fostering social inclusion through their professional practice.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The session demonstrated clearly that the transformation--whether it is related to major infrastructure, agriculture and food security or energy--will be possible only if vulnerable, indigenous and rural/regional communities are involved as equal partners in the decision-making processes required to achieve the transformation in the necessary timeframe.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Impact assessment can play a key role in supporting social inclusion--the opportunity for all individuals and groups of a society to participate equally in their local society and economy. To do so, basic principles and operating principles can be followed to guide best practice.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Be aware that your work can directly inform social inclusion. Engage early. Engage fairly. Leverage the impact assessment process to achieve broader societal improvements.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Require attention to social inclusion in policy and legislative requirements guiding IA in your jurisdiction.


Session Name:  Psycho-Social Impact Assessment

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Sergio Moreira & Will Rifkin


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

There seems to be increasing recognition that PSIA captures the human experience of change in ways that reflect perceptions of justice, providing insight that other forms of IA do not typically capture.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Openness to undertaking PSIA and development of the ability to respond to psycho-social impacts seems important to pursuing justice - in processes and outcomes - during transformation.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The rationale and role for PSIA in addressing the large-scale changes needed is yet to be clearly articulated in a way that supports its more widespread use.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

- PSIA sounds a lot like what good SIA already does, some way. Others disagree. - PSIA digs deeper than typical SIA to identify what is really bothering people, sorting through interconnections among other evident impacts, such as on livelihoods


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Find a way to balance the time needed for in-depth understanding (giving voice and building trust) with commercial imperatives - timeline for a review process and timeline for construction of a project.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Experiment with including elements of PSIA in current impact assessment efforts.


Session Name:  Reflecting Indigenous Knowledge for a Just Transformation in Impact Assessment

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Valerie Masterman


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

We, as IA practitioners, need to continue to educate ourselves about Indigenous Values to align our impact assessments and projects to reflect these. We can't rush into the green energy transition at the expense of meaningful engagement. Independent Indigenous-Led Assessments are necessary to inform the assessment process and results.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Define Valued Components with Indigenous Peoples and take a holistic view instead of only considering the traditional biophysical and social factors. Consider the temporal impacts in a project and the effect this can have on cultural values, including the transmission of information across generations. Try to do better... that's the first step.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Impact Assessments can be a tool to meaningfully define what is being studied in a way that reflects Indigenous Values. Where the proponent falls short the Independent Indigenous-Led Assessments and Assessment tools should be used to better reflect concerns and impacts. Indigenous Assessments need to be considered in the decision making process.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Educate yourselves in the values, history and concerns of Indigenous People, meaningfully define what should be assessed and enable Independent Indigenous-Led Assessments to be considered in the decision-making process.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Governments need to do a better job of meeting Indigenous People on an equal footing and allowing for Indigenous Knowledge to inform the decision-making process when reviewing Impact Assessments.


Session Name:  Remember the spiritual value and the intangibles

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Ahmed Sanda


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1- Trust building in the process 2- Wider consultation and communication 3- Transparency and Education

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Factors: providing direction and continued engagement ( deliberate and where necessary tailored) It can be applied to decision making by anticipating the direction as well as creating the direction towards over all goal/ big picture.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The data acquisition and analytical capabilities of Impact Assessment manifestly positions it to lead the transformation or assist in leading the transformation. Not enough charismatic and or witty Impact Assessment folks rise to strategic positions to effectuate policies, strategies and projects, generally.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

NON


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

They need to volunteer more in order to make meaningful impact for their own personal growth and prosperity.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Policy makers need to shorten the distance between them and 'the second layer of the management cohort.'


Session Name:  Strategic Environmental Assessment

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Thomas Fischer and Ainhoa Gonzalez Del Campo


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

SEA needs to be applied at all strategic decision tiers. Its application is particularly important at the highest levels. Presentations show that this is possible. SEA is now applied in various forms throughout the world with many excellent examples

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Transparency, champions, application at all decision tiers

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Voluntary SEAs (eg by Target Malaria for West Africa); conflict resolution from Korea; national renewable energy planning in South Africa.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

SEA needs to consider what is relevant. This often goes beyond traditional environmental factors to include eg health, social aspects, heritage…


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

We need champions


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

SEA is highly beneficial


Session Name:  Strategic environmental assessment for a just transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Greg Radford, Joyce Kortlandt


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Demands for energy transition minerals will be rising steeply. This offers opportunities but also major challenges for the mining sector that cannot be addressed at the level of individual projects alone. Plans, policies, and programmes for mining should be informed by strategic environmental assessments that balance mining interests with wider economic, environmental, and social interests, consider cumulative impacts of mining and other projects, and look into challenges related to artisanal and small-scale mining. Participants noted many advantages of SEA for mining but while SEAs are mandatory in many countries all over the world, the amount of countries that apply SEA in the mining sector is rather limited.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

ESIAs at project level need to be complemented by SEA at strategic level. However, knowledge about the added value of SEA for responsible mining is limited. There is a need to build awareness and strengthen capacities about the benefits of SEA for responsible mining. SEA for mining is not only relevant for governments and for civil society but also for the private sector, because they consider medium- and long-term infrastructure planning needs. They also reduce costs for mining companies to carry out ESIAs because much of the data needed is already included in the SEA.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

SEAs are often funded by international institutions and sometimes developed as stand-alone studies. It is key that they are connected to programs, plans, and policies. If SEAs are carried out in isolation, there is a risk that they will not be implemented. Implementation requires ownership of the relevant government departments and other key stakeholders from the start. This includes involvement of traditional authorities and bottom-up participation.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

SEAs enhance green and climate smart mining activities at the project level by providing the necessary frameworks. They identify policy gaps, assess what institutional and legal changes are needed and clarify roles and responsibilities of individual actors in relation to responsible mining.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Impact assessment practitioners should make sure that SEAs for mining in which they are involved are part of broader strategic planning that includes policies, plans, and programs relevant to the objectives the government has set for its development of natural resource extraction. In addition, they should ensure that public engagement is carried out from start to finish, and that there is transparency throughout the consultation and information processes.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

It is important to hold sector agencies accountable for the development of SEAs and to clarify responsibilities of all actors involved in SEA development and implementation. The role of the EIA agency is not to develop SEAs but to validate them. NGOs and other stakeholders should encourage governments to make more use of SEA for mining. This is extremely relevant for energy transition minerals whose demands are rising very rapidly. The development of new programs, plans and policies for critical minerals should happen in parallel with and informed by SEAs for mining.


Session Name:  Strategic environmental assessment for a just transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Greg Radford, Joyce Kortlandt


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Demands for energy transition minerals will be rising steeply. This offers opportunities but also major challenges for the mining sector that cannot be addressed at the level of individual projects alone. Plans, policies, and programmes for mining should be informed by strategic environmental assessments that balance mining interests with wider economic, environmental, and social interests, consider cumulative impacts of mining and other projects, and look into challenges related to artisanal and small-scale mining. Participants noted many advantages of SEA for mining but while SEAs are mandatory in many countries all over the world, the amount of countries that apply SEA in the mining sector is rather limited.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

ESIAs at project level need to be complemented by SEA at strategic level. However, knowledge about the added value of SEA for responsible mining is limited. There is a need to build awareness and strengthen capacities about the benefits of SEA for responsible mining. SEA for mining is not only relevant for governments and for civil society but also for the private sector, because they consider medium- and long-term infrastructure planning needs. They also reduce costs for mining companies to carry out ESIAs because much of the data needed is already included in the SEA.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

SEAs are often funded by international institutions and sometimes developed as stand-alone studies. It is key that they are connected to programs, plans, and policies. If SEAs are carried out in isolation, there is a risk that they will not be implemented. Implementation requires ownership of the relevant government departments and other key stakeholders from the start. This includes involvement of traditional authorities and bottom-up participation.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

SEAs enhance green and climate smart mining activities at the project level by providing the necessary frameworks. They identify policy gaps, assess what institutional and legal changes are needed and clarify roles and responsibilities of individual actors in relation to responsible mining.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Impact assessment practitioners should make sure that SEAs for mining in which they are involved are part of broader strategic planning that includes policies, plans, and programs relevant to the objectives the government has set for its development of natural resource extraction. In addition, they should ensure that public engagement is carried out from start to finish, and that there is transparency throughout the consultation and information processes.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

It is important to hold sector agencies accountable for the development of SEAs and to clarify responsibilities of all actors involved in SEA development and implementation. The role of the EIA agency is not to develop SEAs but to validate them. NGOs and other stakeholders should encourage governments to make more use of SEA for mining. This is extremely relevant for energy transition minerals whose demands are rising very rapidly. The development of new programs, plans and policies for critical minerals should happen in parallel with and informed by SEAs for mining.


Session Name:  Streamlining environmental assessments to enable transformation

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Celesa Horvath


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1. Streamlining (or regulatory efficiency) is NOT (just) about doing IA faster; it's about doing IA BETTER. 2. Streamlining (or regulatory efficiency), even for "clean growth projects," cannot come at the expense of local communities or environmental protection. 3. Efforts to streamline IA are more likely to succeed if there has been consultation with IA participants and stakeholders.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

1. Greater reliance on the existing body of knowledge with respect to effects and proven effective mitigation and management measures can and should be applied to streamline IA, to enable IA to focus on the unknown, higher risk issues. 2. The full spectrum of IA tools - strategic IA, regional IA, class IA, project-specific IA - as well as complementary mechanisms (e.g., land use planning) should be deployed to address issues at the right level of policy-and decision-making.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

1. Industry attitudes towards streamlining are not necessarily as expected - evidence was shared that some industry stakeholders see value in IA for building public confidence and social licence, and are concerned that this may be lost if streamlining efforts exclude clean growth projects from IA. 2. Similarly, IA participants (e.g., civil society, NGOs, the public) want to retain a voice in (streamlined) IA but are keen to see IA focused on key issues (not thousands of pages of duplicative information).


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

A natural resistance to change, even when change is for the better, poses a significant barrier for any effort to improve IA; streamlining efforts must be aware of and find ways to overcome this resistance.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Seek to build trust-based relationships with IA participants.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

For IA process administrators and decision-makers: more is not necessarily better; sometimes it's just more - develop the capacity and competency to know when the information in hand is sufficient to proceed, rely on experience, focus on key issues, and be prepared to make decisions in the face of uncertainty. There are tools to manage risk.


Session Name:  Sustainable Finance and impact assessment in the EU

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Adina Relicovschi


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

EU Taxonomy as part of Sustainable Finance Agenda is a completely new classification system to label environmentally sustainable activities where social aspects are integrated (in the form of minimum safeguards) but more insights should be provided as part of implementation. Advocate for a Social Taxonomy (similar to environment) is key.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

While the EU Taxonomy is a new voluntary classification system that is growing very fast, the well established impact assessments and environmental permitting systems should be used to support implementation. Therefore the Substantial Contribution and Do No Significant Harm principles (including their detailed defined criteria) should became integral part of these systems and consequently of decision-making processes.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Fully integration of minimum social safeguards into the impact assessment process and due-diligence performed by the financial sector.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Set up guidance on linkages between EU Taxonomy and EIA/ESIA processes.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Use the technical screening criteria for SC and DNSH as defined in the EU Taxonomy when preparing EIA/ESIA reports


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Develop a EU Social Taxonomy similar to the existing one for the 6 environmental objectives, which has to define what does it mean to substantially contribute to one social objectives and do not harm other social objectives.


Session Name:  The Future of the IA Profession: Transition or Transformation? (Part 1 and 2 combined)

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Rufus Howard


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1. We need better partnerships across and between organisations to build E&S and IA capacity across government, financial institutions, consultancies, developers, academia, NGOs and communities. 2. We need greater emphasis on the importance of ethical practice as individuals and organisations. 3. The voice and role of communities and affected people needs to be strengthened in decision making.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

1. We need capacity building across all organisations and sectors (including communities) to provide better training, coaching, education, recruitment and retention of IA professionals. 2. We need to make better use of technology to enhance and improve IA and assist in generating positive environmental and social outcomes on the ground. 3. The role of ethics, governance and environmental and social values needs to be strengthened in all decision making processes and should include the free prior and informed consent of communities and affected people.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

We had multiple examples from across public and private sectors; incl. E&S Policy at EBRD, E&S training and learning at IFC, the use of AI to assist E&S professionals at the World Bank, the evolution of IA education at Universities, the role and contribution of multidisciplinary E&S consultants, the evolving role of digital impact assessment and databases, capacity building of local government and planners in Northern Ireland, the role of IA leads ad design influencers. Taken together the session highlighted multiple insights into the future direction of travel for the IA profession. These insights will be captured in a forthcoming report on the 'Future of Impact Assessment'.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

We need to think big, and act systematically across all organisations, internationally, to build local competence, capacity and governance to fulfil the potential of impact assessment and environmental and social management in supporting a rapid and just transformation to a low carbon, ecologically thriving, healthy, fair, equitable and sustainable world.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Share your knowledge and experience with colleagues, and through and across wider forums and institutions to contribute to the urgent need for capacity building.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

We need to work in partnership across and between public, private and NGO organisations, and collectively commit to putting communities and affected people at the centre of decision making.


Session Name:  The power of communication!

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Susana Rosa


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

An efficient communication among all stakeholders is very important for a successful impact assessment. Comunication is essential for a just transformation.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

The previous answer applies concerning the contribution of impact assessment for a just transformation. Only an inclusive and adequate communication among all stakeholders can contribute for an informed descision making

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The environmental risk perceptioned by an indigenous community was considered jointly with the risk assessment as traditionally assessed by the IA team.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Digital tools may contribute for inclusion within IA communication, however, visual literacy of stakeholders has to be adequately addressed


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Assure an efficient communication among all stakeholders, adequate to their variable level of experience and cultural environment


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Previous answer applies


Session Name:  The role of Impact Assessment in protecting and Enhancing Heritage

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Dr Urmila Jha Thakur


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

A lot of work is required in the field to see how best 'values' can be framed for heritage sites and explore HIA along with other forms of Impact Assessments to see how best heritage protection can go hand in hand in delivering sustainability.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Heritage Impact Assessment has recently been evolving but this is the predominant type of IA being used in heritage sites and not always proactively. There is potential to engage HIA with other forms of IA, to ensure environmehtal values along with social values are captured better in heritage sites.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Heritage Impact Assessment is pacing up but other forms of IA will also need to be explored in protecting and enhancing heritage. There is need of more pro-active approach in heritage sites to engage widely in establishing environmental, social and economical value of heritage sites.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Re-thinking innovatiovely what form of IA can be used on the heritage sites rather than being reactive to PPPs deveopments and their impacts on the heritage site.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

HIA experts need to work with other types of IA experts in order to think creatively in delivering heritage protection along with sustainability.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

IUCN and ICOMOS may need to work more integretedly in looking at cultural and natural values and IA can be used innovatily to assist in evaluating holistic impacts of heritage sites.


Session Name:  The SEA Directive in EU, 20 Years on: Implementation and Effectiveness

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Andy Fanning and Tadhg O’Mahony


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

a. The effectiveness of SEA is in the mitigations that it leads to. Effectiveness assessment is therefore key to improving practice and impact of SEA. This assessment should consider both self-assessment by practicioners to develop reflexive practice and external objective assessment.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

b. SEA is effective but could be more effective and there is continuing need to increase awareness of it as a key element of impact assessment and mitigation.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

1. SEA is providing a benefit but there is need to develop more capacity for its practice via training and information sharing including guidance on good practice as appears to be available in some countries. Sharing experience between nations with common traits is also a very positive way to increase capability. 2. Within SEA, the session participants stressed the importance of extensive scoping and early engagement in SEA to make it effective.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Practitioners should seek to self audit their assessments and consider how they can get perspectives to provide them with an external assessment of their assessments to support continual improvement in practice.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

As the scope of SEA in Europe is defined by EU legislation, there is need to look again at its coverage to ensure that impactful development is better captured as some very large-scale developments are not captured currently within the scope of SEA.


Session Name:  Toward a just transformation: insights and lessons for impact assessment

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Jack Krohn


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Challenges of being fully inclusive in IA Project/ proponent driven solutions to transition can bypass good strategic thinking/ assessment.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Be inclusive of all parties/ stakeholders/ interest groups. Recognise the background to participants in IA processes will influence how they engage.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

See responses to above questions.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Be inclusive, be patient, be open to acknowledging legitimate but conflicting views.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

See above.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

See above.


Session Name:  Towards a Just Transition for Biodiversity Offsets

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Greg Sharam


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Presentations were in three categories – theory of offsets, linking nature positive to offsets and examples of offsets.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Two key factors were discussed repeatedly: 1) the necessity in including Indigenous voices and partnerships to offsetting planning and implementation, 2) as well as the need for real data to make decisions on, since many attempts at offsetting don’t seem to adequately include background data or don’t’ adequately monitor themselves and show that they are successful. Both of these are required for a just transition.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

The main insights on the role of impact assessment in shaping a just transformation as well as policies were: 1) We have to have really good, inclusive, systems-integrated theory behind any attempt at impact assessment and offsets for them to be rooted in a just transformation. 2) Once we have that theory, it must be translated into policies and strategies. 3) And then those policies and strategies must be taken for a test drive in a draft form, all the while remembering the theory upon which they were developed so that they can be judged for whether they are effective. 4) Those test cases must then be studied for whether they work and accomplish both the theoretical goals and policy goals. 5) These connections from top to bottom need to be made otherwise, it’s easy to get lost in high level theory or the low level policy implications.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

see above


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

see above


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  Transforming the Future of NEPA

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Michael D. Smith


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

That page and time limits are likely not the most effective way of accelerating environmental review and permitting, and that there are many concerns about the diminishment in the quality of environmental review through these and other streamlining factors.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Practitioners need to ensure that despite new streamlining measures being put in place, they need to find ways to still prepare compliant and meaningful environmental reviews. And to go a step beyond and make sure that the reviews are understandable and useful for decision makers, so that they will make meaningful contributions to making decisions.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Proposed changes in the implementing regulations for NEPA would strengthen the analysis of environmental justice impacts and increase substantively the engagement of those communities in the environmental impact analysis and project development process.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  Transitioning to Net Gain: Effectively achieving and measuring biodiversity

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Corin Simmonds, Nicola Faulks


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

That for success an offset needs to be designed with consultation and involvement of local communities. Also the devising of an offset strategy needs some form of evaluation metric so that success can be measured.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

One talk was very interesting in that based on social feed back, people who were losing land to a project are generally against it. Those who's lives will be made better by it are pro the project. Further away, out of the AOI, there are groups of objectors, and no matter how good you make the net gain (in this case for biodiversity), they will still object. General discussion was could more people be involved in designing net gain, if they were would it make a difference. Also, how could this be effectively done?

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Most of the talks especially the TANAP (Turkey) talk, demonstrated that net gain requires consultation and social input. That you can't just expect to create a net gain on someone else's land. That ecosystem services really do have to be taken in to account.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Devising a way to evaluate nature and apply this to offset requirements is difficult and not straight forward. The UK has pushed ahead with BNG, and the local nature recovery strategy, but there is still a long way to go to prove it.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Bespoke measurements for biodiversity value may be a strategy for overseas projects, but key is also good up front, transparent consultation about the project with local communities.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Collate examples of offsetting, learn lessons. The hardest thing has been trying to find projects that have successfully implemented offsetting and achieved a net gain. Even if they haven't, there should still be areas that we as practitioners can learn from.


Session Name:  Underwater Cultural Heritage: Developing approaches and improving data

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Amanda Evans


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

A just transformation includes assessment of intangible underwater heritage, requiring stakeholder engagement to identify multiple areas of "significance". Submerged paleolandscapes can be identified, but "significant" spaces on those landscapes may not be apparent from typical IA data. Our need for stakeholder engagement must not create an undue burden on Traditional Owners or Tribal Nations. Meaningful engagement will require capacity building.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Developers or proponents may need to provide assistance to stakeholders so that they may engage. Projects already consider tangible heritage in the IA process, but stakeholders are also expressing concern over impacts to the intangible heritage.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

Examples included modeling of submerged landscapes, and lessons learned from stakeholder engagement.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Engagement is a long process of relationship building and developing trust. It cannot be rushed to meet project deadlines. It must start early.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Communicate your results in accessible language to support meaningful engagement with and comment from stakeholders. Begin engagement early.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Begin engagement before the project starts.


Session Name:  Using Social Impact Assessments as a Policy Tool to guide Just Transition

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Neelanjana Gupta


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

1. The closure of economically unviable and old coal mines and old power plans is a first step towards a just transition, with investments in economic diversification being at the very core of just transition plans and investments. 2. India’s just transition Journey is very new/recent; it is in the ‘engagement stage’, not having planned or implemented any JT policies yet. 3. Strong baseline labor and social welfare policies are critical for worker transition.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Continuing to build evidence to support policy-making.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):


Session Name:  What is the role of social and environmental practitioners to provide guidance to boards?

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Liz Wall and Amy Sexton


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

Improved social and environmental governance is fundamental to achieve a just transition. Guidance is required to articulate the role and responsibility of both directors and practitioners in delivering a just transition and the Social Practice Forum is a lead contributor in this space.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Our discussion focussed on how to improve the consideration and board engagement on social and environmental issues in their decision-making. This included board actions (e.g. ensuring boards are trained, informed and recieve the right information) and practitioner actions (e.g. practitioners appreciation of and engagement with director's duties and responsibilities, practitioners taking on directoral duties themselves, provision of frank and fearless advice).

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

N/A


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:

Questioning the extent to which boards are engaged in impact assessment processes and/or outcomes.


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Ensuring the language and summary of impact assessments speak to board level processes in language and framing that is compelling to that audience.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Board level knowledge of impact assessments often appears limited which raises further questions on how well social and environmental considerations are informing board-level decisions


Session Name:  What role does IA play in a responsible exit from the fossil fuel sector?

Name(s) of session chair(s):

Janet Blackadar


1. Three messages on the theme “a just transformation”

1a. What were the top lessons from your session about impact assessment and a just transformation?

There has to be a lot of planning ahead of time, in terms of community input, logistics, siting, etc. The size of many proposed "green" projects in terms of footprint are very large and there is a sense that this is not clear to communities. The regulators a re not ready to undertake these reviews.

1b. What key factors discussed in your session can ensure that impact assessment contributes to a just transformation, and how can they be applied in decision making?

Regulatory agencies need to learn about the proposed technologies so that reviews can be focused. Post project implementation and follow up must be done.

1c. What examples or insights from your session illustrated the role of impact assessment in a just transformation and/or the opportunities it presents and challenges it faces in shaping policies, strategies, and projects?

We repeatedly heard that planning is so important. There need to be strategic level assessments to help to identify areas appropriate for different development types. Not all "green" projects are actually green so these impacts need to be well understood and well explained to communities.


2. Any other messages/lessons for impact assessment overall:


3. Recommendations for impact assessment practitioners:

Engage, engage, engage! Constraint mapping is really important to do to help with siting.


4. Recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders (please specify if possible):

Take some time to plan development areas/zones and do strategic and regional assessments.